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Asian: I’m Asian, he’s black.
Asian: I’m Asian, he’s black.

I’m Asian, he’s black.

Asian: revolver-d: Making gems with old Asian aesthetics is so fun!Red(the first one) is by Bait( @baitin! )
Asian: revolver-d:

Making gems with old Asian aesthetics is so fun!Red(the first one) is by Bait( @baitin! )

revolver-d: Making gems with old Asian aesthetics is so fun!Red(the first one) is by Bait( @baitin! )

Asian: “All asian people look the same”
Asian: “All asian people look the same”

“All asian people look the same”

Asian: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: Bruce Lee Was My Friend, and Tarantino's Movie Disrespects Him 8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Alamy Stock Photo Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bruce Lee during the filming of 1978's 'Game of Death.' solacekames: 8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-JabbarThe NBA great and Hollywood Reporter columnist, a friend of the late martial arts star, believes the filmmaker was sloppy, somewhat racist and shirked his responsibility to basic truth in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.’Remember that time Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. kidney-punched a waiter for serving soggy croutons in his tomato soup? How about the time the Dalai Lama got wasted and spray-painted “Karma Is a Beach” on the Tibetan ambassador’s limo? Probably not, since they never happened. But they could happen if a filmmaker decides to write those scenes into his or her movie. And, even though we know the movie is fiction, those scenes will live on in our shared cultural conscience as impressions of those real people, thereby corrupting our memory of them built on their real-life actions.That’s why filmmakers have a responsibility when playing with people’s perceptions of admired historic people to maintain a basic truth about the content of their character. Quentin Tarantino’s portrayal of Bruce Lee in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood does not live up to this standard. Of course, Tarantino has the artistic right to portray Bruce any way he wants. But to do so in such a sloppy and somewhat racist way is a failure both as an artist and as a human being.This controversy has left me torn. Tarantino is one of my favorite filmmakers because he is so bold, uncompromising and unpredictable. There’s a giddy energy in his movies of someone who loves movies and wants you to love them, too. I attend each Tarantino film as if it were an event, knowing that his distillation of the ’60s and ’70s action movies will be much more entertaining than a simple homage. That’s what makes the Bruce Lee scenes so disappointing, not so much on a factual basis, but as a lapse of cultural awareness.Bruce Lee was my friend and teacher. That doesn’t give him a free pass for how he’s portrayed in movies. But it does give me some insight into the man. I first met Bruce when I was a student at UCLA looking to continue my martial arts studies, which I started in New York City. We quickly developed a friendship as well as a student-teacher relationship. He taught me the discipline and spirituality of martial arts, which was greatly responsible for me being able to play competitively in the NBA for 20 years with very few injuries.During our years of friendship, he spoke passionately about how frustrated he was with the stereotypical representation of Asians in film and TV. The only roles were for inscrutable villains or bowing servants. In Have Gun - Will Travel, Paladin’s faithful Chinese servant goes by the insulting name of “Hey Boy” (Kam Tong). He was replaced in season four by a female character referred to as “Hey Girl” (Lisa Lu). Asian men were portrayed as sexless accessories to a scene, while the women were subservient. This was how African-American men and women were generally portrayed until the advent of Sidney Poitier and blaxploitation films. Bruce was dedicated to changing the dismissive image of Asians through his acting, writing and promotion of Jeet Kune Do, his interpretation of martial arts.That’s why it disturbs me that Tarantino chose to portray Bruce in such a one-dimensional way. The John Wayne machismo attitude of Cliff (Brad Pitt), an aging stuntman who defeats the arrogant, uppity Chinese guy harks back to the very stereotypes Bruce was trying to dismantle. Of course the blond, white beefcake American can beat your fancy Asian chopsocky dude because that foreign crap doesn’t fly here.I might even go along with the skewered version of Bruce if that wasn’t the only significant scene with him, if we’d also seen a glimpse of his other traits, of his struggle to be taken seriously in Hollywood. Alas, he was just another Hey Boy prop to the scene. The scene is complicated by being presented as a flashback, but in a way that could suggest the stuntman’s memory is cartoonishly biased in his favor. Equally disturbing is the unresolved shadow that Cliff may have killed his wife with a spear gun because she nagged him. Classic Cliff. Is Cliff more heroic because he also doesn’t put up with outspoken women?I was in public with Bruce several times when some random jerk would loudly challenge Bruce to a fight. He always politely declined and moved on. First rule of Bruce’s fight club was don’t fight — unless there is no other option. He felt no need to prove himself. He knew who he was and that the real fight wasn’t on the mat, it was on the screen in creating opportunities for Asians to be seen as more than grinning stereotypes. Unfortunately, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood prefers the good old ways.
Asian: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: Bruce
 Lee Was My Friend, and
 Tarantino's Movie Disrespects
 Him
 8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
 Alamy Stock Photo
 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bruce Lee during the filming of 1978's 'Game of Death.'
solacekames:

8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-JabbarThe NBA great and Hollywood Reporter columnist, a friend of the late martial arts star, believes the filmmaker was sloppy, somewhat racist and shirked his responsibility to basic truth in ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.’Remember that time Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. kidney-punched a waiter for serving soggy croutons in his tomato soup? How about the time the Dalai Lama got wasted and spray-painted “Karma Is a Beach” on the Tibetan ambassador’s limo? Probably not, since they never happened. But they could happen if a filmmaker decides to write those scenes into his or her movie. And, even though we know the movie is fiction, those scenes will live on in our shared cultural conscience as impressions of those real people, thereby corrupting our memory of them built on their real-life actions.That’s why filmmakers have a responsibility when playing with people’s perceptions of admired historic people to maintain a basic truth about the content of their character. Quentin Tarantino’s portrayal of Bruce Lee in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood does not live up to this standard. Of course, Tarantino has the artistic right to portray Bruce any way he wants. But to do so in such a sloppy and somewhat racist way is a failure both as an artist and as a human being.This controversy has left me torn. Tarantino is one of my favorite filmmakers because he is so bold, uncompromising and unpredictable. There’s a giddy energy in his movies of someone who loves movies and wants you to love them, too. I attend each Tarantino film as if it were an event, knowing that his distillation of the ’60s and ’70s action movies will be much more entertaining than a simple homage. That’s what makes the Bruce Lee scenes so disappointing, not so much on a factual basis, but as a lapse of cultural awareness.Bruce Lee was my friend and teacher. That doesn’t give him a free pass for how he’s portrayed in movies. But it does give me some insight into the man. I first met Bruce when I was a student at UCLA looking to continue my martial arts studies, which I started in New York City. We quickly developed a friendship as well as a student-teacher relationship. He taught me the discipline and spirituality of martial arts, which was greatly responsible for me being able to play competitively in the NBA for 20 years with very few injuries.During our years of friendship, he spoke passionately about how frustrated he was with the stereotypical representation of Asians in film and TV. The only roles were for inscrutable villains or bowing servants. In Have Gun - Will Travel, Paladin’s faithful Chinese servant goes by the insulting name of “Hey Boy” (Kam Tong). He was replaced in season four by a female character referred to as “Hey Girl” (Lisa Lu). Asian men were portrayed as sexless accessories to a scene, while the women were subservient. This was how African-American men and women were generally portrayed until the advent of Sidney Poitier and blaxploitation films. Bruce was dedicated to changing the dismissive image of Asians through his acting, writing and promotion of Jeet Kune Do, his interpretation of martial arts.That’s why it disturbs me that Tarantino chose to portray Bruce in such a one-dimensional way. The John Wayne machismo attitude of Cliff (Brad Pitt), an aging stuntman who defeats the arrogant, uppity Chinese guy harks back to the very stereotypes Bruce was trying to dismantle. Of course the blond, white beefcake American can beat your fancy Asian chopsocky dude because that foreign crap doesn’t fly here.I might even go along with the skewered version of Bruce if that wasn’t the only significant scene with him, if we’d also seen a glimpse of his other traits, of his struggle to be taken seriously in Hollywood. Alas, he was just another Hey Boy prop to the scene. The scene is complicated by being presented as a flashback, but in a way that could suggest the stuntman’s memory is cartoonishly biased in his favor. Equally disturbing is the unresolved shadow that Cliff may have killed his wife with a spear gun because she nagged him. Classic Cliff. Is Cliff more heroic because he also doesn’t put up with outspoken women?I was in public with Bruce several times when some random jerk would loudly challenge Bruce to a fight. He always politely declined and moved on. First rule of Bruce’s fight club was don’t fight — unless there is no other option. He felt no need to prove himself. He knew who he was and that the real fight wasn’t on the mat, it was on the screen in creating opportunities for Asians to be seen as more than grinning stereotypes. Unfortunately, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood prefers the good old ways.

solacekames: 8:08 AM PDT 8/16/2019 by Kareem Abdul-JabbarThe NBA great and Hollywood Reporter columnist, a friend of the late martial ar...

Asian: School LibraryJournal @sljournal SLJ An Updated Look at Diversity in Children's Books ow.ly/nerj50uIXed DIVERSITY IN 8 CHILDREN'S BOOKS Percentage of books depicting characters from diverse backgrounds based on the 2018 publishing statistics compiled by the Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison: ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pcstats.asp 50% 7% 1% 5% 10% 27% +a 558 0OKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOK American Asian Pacific Islander/Asian Pacific American Latinx African/ White Animals/Other Indians/ African The CCBC Inventory includes 3,134 books published in 2018. This grophic would not hove been possible without the statistics compiled by the CCBC, ond the review and feedbock we received from Edith Compbel, Molly Beth Griffin, K. T. Horning, Debble Reese, Ebony Ellzabeth Thomas, and Modeline Tyner, Many thanks First Nations American ustration by David Huyck, in consultation with Sarah Park Dohlen Released under a Creative Commons 8Y-SA licenses https//creativecommons.org/Bicenses/by-so/4.0/ 7:30 AM Jun 20, 2019 Hootsuite Inc. 1.3K Likes 821 Retweets It is gia, hello @missgiagiagia Animals had more representation than all Black, brown and indigenous people combined. Our children deserve better. Deserve MORE SLJ SchoolLibraryJournal @sljournal 19h An Updated Look at Diversity in Children's Books ow.ly/nerj50uIXed DIVERSITY IN CHILDREN'S BOOKSZU18 Percentage of books depicting characters from diverse backgrounds based on the 2018 publishing statistics compiled by the Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison: ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pestats.asp 5% 7% 10% 27% 50% L558 BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS African White American Latinx Asian Pacific Animals/Other Indians/ Islander/Asian African 2:14 PM Jun 20, 2019 Twitt er for iPad 4.4K Likes 2.3K Retweets superunfriendlyreminder: That actually explains why we come after animals on the list of “ deaths that actually matter to white ppl”
Asian: School LibraryJournal
 @sljournal
 SLJ
 An Updated Look at Diversity in
 Children's Books
 ow.ly/nerj50uIXed
 DIVERSITY IN 8
 CHILDREN'S BOOKS
 Percentage of books depicting characters from diverse backgrounds
 based on the 2018 publishing statistics compiled by the
 Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education,
 University of Wisconsin-Madison:
 ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pcstats.asp
 50%
 7%
 1%
 5%
 10%
 27%
 +a
 558
 0OKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOK
 American
 Asian Pacific
 Islander/Asian
 Pacific American
 Latinx
 African/
 White
 Animals/Other
 Indians/
 African
 The CCBC Inventory includes 3,134 books published in 2018. This grophic would not
 hove been possible without the statistics compiled by the CCBC, ond the review and
 feedbock we received from Edith Compbel, Molly Beth Griffin, K. T. Horning,
 Debble Reese, Ebony Ellzabeth Thomas, and Modeline Tyner, Many thanks
 First Nations
 American
 ustration by David Huyck, in consultation with Sarah Park Dohlen
 Released under a Creative Commons 8Y-SA licenses https//creativecommons.org/Bicenses/by-so/4.0/
 7:30 AM Jun 20, 2019 Hootsuite Inc.
 1.3K Likes
 821 Retweets

 It is gia, hello
 @missgiagiagia
 Animals had more representation than
 all Black, brown and indigenous
 people combined. Our children
 deserve better. Deserve MORE
 SLJ SchoolLibraryJournal @sljournal 19h
 An Updated Look at Diversity in Children's Books
 ow.ly/nerj50uIXed
 DIVERSITY IN
 CHILDREN'S BOOKSZU18
 Percentage of books depicting characters from diverse backgrounds
 based on the 2018 publishing statistics compiled by the
 Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education,
 University of Wisconsin-Madison:
 ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pestats.asp
 5%
 7%
 10%
 27%
 50%
 L558
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 African
 White
 American
 Latinx
 Asian Pacific
 Animals/Other
 Indians/
 Islander/Asian
 African
 2:14 PM Jun 20, 2019 Twitt er for iPad
 4.4K Likes
 2.3K Retweets
superunfriendlyreminder:

That actually explains why we come after animals on the list of “ deaths that actually matter to white ppl”

superunfriendlyreminder: That actually explains why we come after animals on the list of “ deaths that actually matter to white ppl”

Asian: School LibraryJournal @sljournal SLJ An Updated Look at Diversity in Children's Books ow.ly/nerj50uIXed DIVERSITY IN 8 CHILDREN'S BOOKS Percentage of books depicting characters from diverse backgrounds based on the 2018 publishing statistics compiled by the Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison: ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pcstats.asp 50% 7% 1% 5% 10% 27% +a 558 0OKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOK American Asian Pacific Islander/Asian Pacific American Latinx African/ White Animals/Other Indians/ African The CCBC Inventory includes 3,134 books published in 2018. This grophic would not hove been possible without the statistics compiled by the CCBC, ond the review and feedbock we received from Edith Compbel, Molly Beth Griffin, K. T. Horning, Debble Reese, Ebony Ellzabeth Thomas, and Modeline Tyner, Many thanks First Nations American ustration by David Huyck, in consultation with Sarah Park Dohlen Released under a Creative Commons 8Y-SA licenses https//creativecommons.org/Bicenses/by-so/4.0/ 7:30 AM Jun 20, 2019 Hootsuite Inc. 1.3K Likes 821 Retweets It is gia, hello @missgiagiagia Animals had more representation than all Black, brown and indigenous people combined. Our children deserve better. Deserve MORE SLJ SchoolLibraryJournal @sljournal 19h An Updated Look at Diversity in Children's Books ow.ly/nerj50uIXed DIVERSITY IN CHILDREN'S BOOKSZU18 Percentage of books depicting characters from diverse backgrounds based on the 2018 publishing statistics compiled by the Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison: ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pestats.asp 5% 7% 10% 27% 50% L558 BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS African White American Latinx Asian Pacific Animals/Other Indians/ Islander/Asian African 2:14 PM Jun 20, 2019 Twitt er for iPad 4.4K Likes 2.3K Retweets superunfriendlyreminder: That actually explains why we come after animals on the list of “ deaths that actually matter to white ppl”
Asian: School LibraryJournal
 @sljournal
 SLJ
 An Updated Look at Diversity in
 Children's Books
 ow.ly/nerj50uIXed
 DIVERSITY IN 8
 CHILDREN'S BOOKS
 Percentage of books depicting characters from diverse backgrounds
 based on the 2018 publishing statistics compiled by the
 Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education,
 University of Wisconsin-Madison:
 ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pcstats.asp
 50%
 7%
 1%
 5%
 10%
 27%
 +a
 558
 0OKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOK
 American
 Asian Pacific
 Islander/Asian
 Pacific American
 Latinx
 African/
 White
 Animals/Other
 Indians/
 African
 The CCBC Inventory includes 3,134 books published in 2018. This grophic would not
 hove been possible without the statistics compiled by the CCBC, ond the review and
 feedbock we received from Edith Compbel, Molly Beth Griffin, K. T. Horning,
 Debble Reese, Ebony Ellzabeth Thomas, and Modeline Tyner, Many thanks
 First Nations
 American
 ustration by David Huyck, in consultation with Sarah Park Dohlen
 Released under a Creative Commons 8Y-SA licenses https//creativecommons.org/Bicenses/by-so/4.0/
 7:30 AM Jun 20, 2019 Hootsuite Inc.
 1.3K Likes
 821 Retweets

 It is gia, hello
 @missgiagiagia
 Animals had more representation than
 all Black, brown and indigenous
 people combined. Our children
 deserve better. Deserve MORE
 SLJ SchoolLibraryJournal @sljournal 19h
 An Updated Look at Diversity in Children's Books
 ow.ly/nerj50uIXed
 DIVERSITY IN
 CHILDREN'S BOOKSZU18
 Percentage of books depicting characters from diverse backgrounds
 based on the 2018 publishing statistics compiled by the
 Cooperative Children's Book Center, School of Education,
 University of Wisconsin-Madison:
 ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pestats.asp
 5%
 7%
 10%
 27%
 50%
 L558
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 BOOKS
 African
 White
 American
 Latinx
 Asian Pacific
 Animals/Other
 Indians/
 Islander/Asian
 African
 2:14 PM Jun 20, 2019 Twitt er for iPad
 4.4K Likes
 2.3K Retweets
superunfriendlyreminder:


That actually explains why we come after animals on the list of “ deaths that actually matter to white ppl”

superunfriendlyreminder: That actually explains why we come after animals on the list of “ deaths that actually matter to white ppl”