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Memes, British, and 🤖: Tom Walker has won the BRIT Award for British Breakthrough Act BRITs
Memes, British, and 🤖: Tom Walker has won the BRIT Award for British Breakthrough Act BRITs

Tom Walker has won the BRIT Award for British Breakthrough Act BRITs

Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Trump: On this day in 2015, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton delivered a breakthrough duet in the first ever, “Debate: The Musical.”
Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Trump: On this day in 2015, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton delivered a breakthrough duet in the first ever, “Debate: The Musical.”

On this day in 2015, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton delivered a breakthrough duet in the first ever, “Debate: The Musical.”

Asian, Beautiful, and Children: The Observer Muslim foster parents: We'd never had a Christmas tree it made them so happy <p><a href="http://ikkimikki.tumblr.com/post/168587488460/philtippett-ithelpstodream-once-the-children" class="tumblr_blog">ikkimikki</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://philtippett.tumblr.com/post/168428590826/ithelpstodream-once-the-children-were-asleep" class="tumblr_blog">philtippett</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://ithelpstodream.tumblr.com/post/168152017582/once-the-children-were-asleep-sajjad-headed-out" class="tumblr_blog">ithelpstodream</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” </p> <p>The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree.</p> <p>“I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them.</p> <p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu">https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu</a></p> </blockquote> <p>this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled:</p> <blockquote> <p>…she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.”</p> <p>The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says.</p> <p>Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu.</p> <p>“I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.”</p> <p>[…]</p> <p>Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left.</p> <p>“It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.”</p> <p>The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.”</p> </blockquote> </blockquote> <p>What a beautifully loving family. </p> </blockquote> <p>This makes my heart happy </p>
Asian, Beautiful, and Children: The Observer
 Muslim foster parents: We'd
 never had a Christmas tree
 it made them so happy
<p><a href="http://ikkimikki.tumblr.com/post/168587488460/philtippett-ithelpstodream-once-the-children" class="tumblr_blog">ikkimikki</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://philtippett.tumblr.com/post/168428590826/ithelpstodream-once-the-children-were-asleep" class="tumblr_blog">philtippett</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://ithelpstodream.tumblr.com/post/168152017582/once-the-children-were-asleep-sajjad-headed-out" class="tumblr_blog">ithelpstodream</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” </p>

<p>The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree.</p>

<p>“I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them.</p>

<p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu">https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu</a></p>
</blockquote>
<p>this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled:</p>

<blockquote>
<p>…she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.”</p>
<p>The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says.</p>

<p>Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu.</p>

<p>“I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.”</p>
<p>[…]</p>
<p>Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left.</p>

<p>“It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.”</p>

<p>The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.”</p>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p>What a beautifully loving family. </p>
</blockquote>

<p>This makes my heart happy </p>

ikkimikki: philtippett: ithelpstodream: Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims ...

Black History Month, Chelsea, and College: <p>Black history month black artists day 6: Going a bit modern today with American actor, comedian, and filmmaker Jordan Peele.</p> <p>Peele was born in 1979 and raised by a single mother on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. He attended Sarah Lawrence College for two years before dropping out to form a comedy duo with his roommate Rebecca Drysdale. In the early 2000’s he was cast as a regular in MADtv, where he first met fellow comedian Keegan Michael Key and the two were soon cast alongside each other for most sketches due to their great comedic chemistry, eventually leading to their own spinoff series as comedy duo Key &amp; Peele. The series had great success from 2012 to 2015, and the duo also coproduced the critically praised film “Keanu” in 2016.</p> <p>In February 2017, Peele had a career breakthrough with his solo directorial debut, the horror film “Get Out”, which earned enormous critical acclaim and was a box office success. It is considered one of the most profitable films of all time, grossing over $250 million next to a budget of $4.5 million. The film also received numerous accolades, including Academy Award nominations for Best Director, Best Picture, and Best Original Screenplay. Peele became the third person (after Warren Beatty and James L. Brooks) to receive those three nominations for a debut film, and the first black filmmaker to receive them for any one film. Peele also won the Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Award at the 2017 Gotham Independent Fim Awards, and a BAFTA nomination for Best Original Screenplay.</p> <p>Peele has been married to Chelsea Perretti, actress of Brooklyn Nine-Nine fame, since 2016 and the two recently welcomed a son, Beaumont Gino Peele.</p> <p><a href="https://tmblr.co/mYLcpdBmia5YP2ZY7ohOuxA">@markhamillz</a></p>
Black History Month, Chelsea, and College: <p>Black history month black artists day 6: Going a bit modern today with American actor, comedian, and filmmaker Jordan Peele.</p>

<p>Peele was born in 1979 and raised by a single mother on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. He attended Sarah Lawrence College for two years before dropping out to form a comedy duo with his roommate Rebecca Drysdale. In the early 2000’s he was cast as a regular in MADtv, where he first met fellow comedian Keegan Michael Key and the two were soon cast alongside each other for most sketches due to their great comedic chemistry, eventually leading to their own spinoff series as comedy duo Key &amp; Peele. The series had great success from 2012 to 2015, and the duo also coproduced the critically praised film “Keanu” in 2016.</p>

<p>In February 2017, Peele had a career breakthrough with his solo directorial debut, the horror film “Get Out”, which earned enormous critical acclaim and was a box office success. It is considered one of the most profitable films of all time, grossing over $250 million next to a budget of $4.5 million. The film also received numerous accolades, including Academy Award nominations for Best Director, Best Picture, and Best Original Screenplay. Peele became the third person (after Warren Beatty and James L. Brooks) to receive those three nominations for a debut film, and the first black filmmaker to receive them for any one film. Peele also won the Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Award at the 2017 Gotham Independent Fim Awards, and a BAFTA nomination for Best Original Screenplay.</p>

<p>Peele has been married to Chelsea Perretti, actress of Brooklyn Nine-Nine fame, since 2016 and the two recently welcomed a son, Beaumont Gino Peele.</p>

<p><a href="https://tmblr.co/mYLcpdBmia5YP2ZY7ohOuxA">@markhamillz</a></p>

Black history month black artists day 6: Going a bit modern today with American actor, comedian, and filmmaker Jordan Peele. Peele was born...

Albert Einstein, Goals, and Life: I WANT NOTHING BUT POSITIVE VIBES SURROUNDING ME. The people we choose to surround ourselves with impacts the way we think, act and feel on a day-to-day basis. In many ways, entrepreneurial success is determined much like success in any other aspect of life. As entrepreneurs, we are responsible for ourselves. Surrounding yourself with the right type of people can help success come more naturally to you than being around those who might hold you back. - Here are the 4 types of people to surround yourself with for SUCCESS: - ✔️HARD workers. You probably know somebody who is a relentless worker, or perhaps you are one yourself. These types of workers push us to work harder each and every day. While measuring personal success against the success of another is like comparing apples and oranges, we can measure our drive with the drive of other relentless workers. True passion and commitment will breed a successful business. ✔️Positive attitudes. People tend to be better at what they’re doing if they’re happy. Negative attitudes can drag down work ethic and they don’t offer any inspiration for success or innovation. ✔️ People who ask questions. Albert Einstein once said “the important thing is to not stop questioning.” As entrepreneurs, we should constantly be asking questions about ourselves and our business. However, no single person will think of every important question. People who ask questions may provide a different angle on an issue or an idea, and these questions could ultimately lead to an important breakthrough for you or your business. Perspective is everything. ✔️Some non-entrepreneurial types will consider all entrepreneurs “dreamers.” However, we understand that setting goals and working hard will help us achieve what many consider to be unachievable. To keep this drive going, we should always be surrounding ourselves with people who have similar goals in mind. - success harwork millionairementor
Albert Einstein, Goals, and Life: I WANT NOTHING
 BUT POSITIVE VIBES
 SURROUNDING ME.
The people we choose to surround ourselves with impacts the way we think, act and feel on a day-to-day basis. In many ways, entrepreneurial success is determined much like success in any other aspect of life. As entrepreneurs, we are responsible for ourselves. Surrounding yourself with the right type of people can help success come more naturally to you than being around those who might hold you back. - Here are the 4 types of people to surround yourself with for SUCCESS: - ✔️HARD workers. You probably know somebody who is a relentless worker, or perhaps you are one yourself. These types of workers push us to work harder each and every day. While measuring personal success against the success of another is like comparing apples and oranges, we can measure our drive with the drive of other relentless workers. True passion and commitment will breed a successful business. ✔️Positive attitudes. People tend to be better at what they’re doing if they’re happy. Negative attitudes can drag down work ethic and they don’t offer any inspiration for success or innovation. ✔️ People who ask questions. Albert Einstein once said “the important thing is to not stop questioning.” As entrepreneurs, we should constantly be asking questions about ourselves and our business. However, no single person will think of every important question. People who ask questions may provide a different angle on an issue or an idea, and these questions could ultimately lead to an important breakthrough for you or your business. Perspective is everything. ✔️Some non-entrepreneurial types will consider all entrepreneurs “dreamers.” However, we understand that setting goals and working hard will help us achieve what many consider to be unachievable. To keep this drive going, we should always be surrounding ourselves with people who have similar goals in mind. - success harwork millionairementor

The people we choose to surround ourselves with impacts the way we think, act and feel on a day-to-day basis. In many ways, entrepreneurial ...

Asian, Beautiful, and Children: The Observer Muslim foster parents: We'd never had a Christmas tree it made them so happy ikkimikki: philtippett: ithelpstodream: Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree. “I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled: …she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.” The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says. Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu. “I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.” […] Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left. “It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.” The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.” What a beautifully loving family.
Asian, Beautiful, and Children: The Observer
 Muslim foster parents: We'd
 never had a Christmas tree
 it made them so happy
ikkimikki:
philtippett:

ithelpstodream:

Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” 

The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree.

“I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu

this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled:


…she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.”
The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says.

Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu.

“I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.”
[…]
Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left.

“It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.”

The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.”


What a beautifully loving family.

ikkimikki: philtippett: ithelpstodream: Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims an...