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Being Alone, Apparently, and Dogs: daftalchemist: themintywitch: daftalchemist: I ever mention that I know someone whose family owned a zombie dog because that's some real shit that I get to delight with at parties Tell us that story? okay here is the story of the zombie dog this dog's name was John. they found him half drowned in a bag of puppies that were not so fortunate as he was, and was taken in immediately. he was a runt and not quite right (most likely from the whole half drowned thing), but a very loving dog the problem with John was that he smelled like death, and no one knew why. vets couldn't figure it out. it was obviously some kind of skin problem, but they had no idea what kind. all anyone knew was that if you touched him, you would smell like death too, so you couldn't pet him, and that for some reason, the only thing that made the smell go away was being around other dogs. so they got another dog and the death smell stopped and John lived a very happy life when he was getting old, maybe about 15 years, part of his skull caved in. just like that! suddenly had a huge dent in his head! and he was totally fine. didn't notice it, didn't affect him at all. just this massive dent right there in his head where his skull had collapsed in on his brain, and he was still the happiest and most loving dog. the skull cave in, for whatever reason, caused the ear on that side of his head to just fall off entirely, but again, pertectly happy dog who did not know he was down an ear and a fully formed skull. they took him to the vet, thinking maybe they should put him down. I mean, wouldn't you think so? but the vet said that the dog was eating, and pooping, and happy, so there was no reason to put him down, so they didn't but that's not even the weird part. the weird part is the area of the brain that got caved in on was apparently the area that registers pain, so this one-eared, collapsed skull dog could no longer feel any pain. he got old, his joints got stiff, his teeth rotted out of his head, his tongue hung out of his mouth and got black and hard, and he felt none of it! in fact, he was happier than he'd ever been feeling no pain, and the fact that he didn't feel how much he was falling apart somehow made him live until he was 23. that's right, the collapsed skull, one eared, zero teeth, smells like literal death when alone dog lived to be 23 years old. they used to joke that he'd been dead for years, but was too stupid to realize it yet and that's the story about the literal zombie dog my friend's family owned The story of the zombie dog
Being Alone, Apparently, and Dogs: daftalchemist:
 themintywitch:
 daftalchemist:
 I ever mention that I know someone whose family owned a zombie dog
 because that's some real shit that I get to delight with at parties
 Tell us that story?
 okay here is the story of the zombie dog
 this dog's name was John. they found him half drowned in a bag of puppies that were
 not so fortunate as he was, and was taken in immediately. he was a runt and not
 quite right (most likely from the whole half drowned thing), but a very loving dog
 the problem with John was that he smelled like death, and no one knew why. vets
 couldn't figure it out. it was obviously some kind of skin problem, but they had no
 idea what kind. all anyone knew was that if you touched him, you would smell like
 death too, so you couldn't pet him, and that for some reason, the only thing that
 made the smell go away was being around other dogs. so they got another dog and
 the death smell stopped and John lived a very happy life
 when he was getting old, maybe about 15 years, part of his skull caved in. just like
 that! suddenly had a huge dent in his head! and he was totally fine. didn't notice it,
 didn't affect him at all. just this massive dent right there in his head where his skull
 had collapsed in on his brain, and he was still the happiest and most loving dog. the
 skull cave in, for whatever reason, caused the ear on that side of his head to just fall
 off entirely, but again, pertectly happy dog who did not know he was down an ear and
 a fully formed skull. they took him to the vet, thinking maybe they should put him
 down. I mean, wouldn't you think so? but the vet said that the dog was eating, and
 pooping, and happy, so there was no reason to put him down, so they didn't
 but that's not even the weird part. the weird part is the area of the brain that got
 caved in on was apparently the area that registers pain, so this one-eared, collapsed
 skull dog could no longer feel any pain. he got old, his joints got stiff, his teeth rotted
 out of his head, his tongue hung out of his mouth and got black and hard, and he felt
 none of it! in fact, he was happier than he'd ever been feeling no pain, and the fact
 that he didn't feel how much he was falling apart somehow made him live until he
 was 23. that's right, the collapsed skull, one eared, zero teeth, smells like literal death
 when alone dog lived to be 23 years old. they used to joke that he'd been dead for
 years, but was too stupid to realize it yet
 and that's the story about the literal zombie dog my friend's family owned
The story of the zombie dog

The story of the zombie dog

Carrie Fisher, Dove, and Drinking: BECA TRBECA% F LM FEST VAL ECA FİLM FESTIVAL VAL FE TRIBECA FİLM FESTIVAL RBECA FILM TR BECA FILM FEST VAL FESTIVAL ︶ vox: To Carrie Fisher, a woman who knew the power of accepting yourself without apology Carrie Fisher spent a lifetime fighting people’s expectations and found a new hope in not giving a shit what I, you, or anyone else thought of her — which is exactly why I’ve always thought the world of her. My introduction to Fisher was the same as most people’s: staring up at a screen in wide-eyed admiration and wonder as her steely Princess Leia took Star Wars by storm and sheer force of will. She was a 19-year-old thrown into the twin chaoses of deep space and Hollywood, and she proved a shining star in both. But as I grew older and dove deeper into Fisher’s history and ongoing career, I discovered a life overflowing with wit, advocacy, and incredible strength. As she would be the first to tell you, Fisher’s life co-starred a devastating cocktail of addiction and mental illness. Thrust into the most competitive Hollywood echelons before she was 20 — and having grown up around it, being the daughter of singer Eddie Fisher and actress Debbie Reynolds — she absorbed whatever chemicals she could to get by, not believing the doctors who told her that her addictions were exacerbated by a form of manic depression. (She was later diagnosed as bipolar.) In 1987, with the benefit of hindsight, Fisher wrote in her semi-autobiographical novel Postcards from the Edge about the horrors of being trapped inside your own mind while outside pressures do everything they can to cave in the walls. “I shot through my 20s like a luminous thread through a dark needle, blazing toward my destination,” she wrote. “Nowhere.” But in real life, Carrie Fisher wasn’t just going somewhere, she was going somewhere meaningful and funny and relentlessly smart. She came out of her turbulent 20s determined to forge a new path, one that defied anyone to look at her and see a girl in a gold bikini while conveniently ignoring its accompanying chains. (Fisher famously hated that stupid “outfit,” no matter how many adolescent fantasies it inspired. When promoting 2015’s The Force Awakens, she even made sure to remind everyone that the Slave Leia bikini was for a slave, “a prisoner of a giant testicle.”) Carrie Fisher wrote her way out of her own horror, from Postcards from the Edge in 1987 to her wickedly funny one-woman show Wishful Drinking in 2006, to her journal compilation The Princess Diarist, published just a month ago. All along the way, she was open about her struggles and mental health in a way that few dared — and she was funny while she did it. You don’t have to look any further than her Twitter bio — “there’s no room for demons when you’re self-possessed” — to understand exactly who Carrie Fisher was. She was crucially, completely unashamed of who she was, talking openly about her mental breaks, the psychotic episodes that would send her careening and land her in clinics. She made it clear that while she knew her brain could be an insidious Trojan horse determined to make her life hell from the inside out, she was able to persevere by accepting that reality as fact. “I am mentally ill. I can say that. I am not ashamed of that,” Fisher told Sawyer in that 2000 interview. “I survived that, I’m still surviving it, but bring it on. Better me than you.” Carrie Fisher took on the dark forces inside and surrounding her by finding something precious to hold onto, something to humanize, something to laugh about. She stormed through her chaotic mind and world to forge an unapologetic life, inspiring countless others — like me, and maybe even you — to do the same.
Carrie Fisher, Dove, and Drinking: BECA
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 FEST VAL
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 FİLM
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 TRIBECA
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vox:
To Carrie Fisher, a woman who knew the power of accepting yourself without apology
Carrie Fisher spent a lifetime fighting people’s expectations and found a new hope in not giving a shit what I, you, or anyone else thought of her — which is exactly why I’ve always thought the world of her.
My introduction to Fisher was the same as most people’s: staring up at a screen in wide-eyed admiration and wonder as her steely Princess Leia took Star Wars by storm and sheer force of will. She was a 19-year-old thrown into the twin chaoses of deep space and Hollywood, and she proved a shining star in both.
But as I grew older and dove deeper into Fisher’s history and ongoing career, I discovered a life overflowing with wit, advocacy, and incredible strength.
As she would be the first to tell you, Fisher’s life co-starred a devastating cocktail of addiction and mental illness. Thrust into the most competitive Hollywood echelons before she was 20 — and having grown up around it, being the daughter of singer Eddie Fisher and actress Debbie Reynolds — she absorbed whatever chemicals she could to get by, not believing the doctors who told her that her addictions were exacerbated by a form of manic depression. (She was later diagnosed as bipolar.)
In 1987, with the benefit of hindsight, Fisher wrote in her semi-autobiographical novel Postcards from the Edge about the horrors of being trapped inside your own mind while outside pressures do everything they can to cave in the walls. “I shot through my 20s like a luminous thread through a dark needle, blazing toward my destination,” she wrote. “Nowhere.”
But in real life, Carrie Fisher wasn’t just going somewhere, she was going somewhere meaningful and funny and relentlessly smart. She came out of her turbulent 20s determined to forge a new path, one that defied anyone to look at her and see a girl in a gold bikini while conveniently ignoring its accompanying chains.
(Fisher famously hated that stupid “outfit,” no matter how many adolescent fantasies it inspired. When promoting 2015’s The Force Awakens, she even made sure to remind everyone that the Slave Leia bikini was for a slave, “a prisoner of a giant testicle.”)
Carrie Fisher wrote her way out of her own horror, from Postcards from the Edge in 1987 to her wickedly funny one-woman show Wishful Drinking in 2006, to her journal compilation The Princess Diarist, published just a month ago.
All along the way, she was open about her struggles and mental health in a way that few dared — and she was funny while she did it. You don’t have to look any further than her Twitter bio — “there’s no room for demons when you’re self-possessed” — to understand exactly who Carrie Fisher was.
She was crucially, completely unashamed of who she was, talking openly about her mental breaks, the psychotic episodes that would send her careening and land her in clinics. She made it clear that while she knew her brain could be an insidious Trojan horse determined to make her life hell from the inside out, she was able to persevere by accepting that reality as fact.
“I am mentally ill. I can say that. I am not ashamed of that,” Fisher told Sawyer in that 2000 interview. “I survived that, I’m still surviving it, but bring it on. Better me than you.”
Carrie Fisher took on the dark forces inside and surrounding her by finding something precious to hold onto, something to humanize, something to laugh about. She stormed through her chaotic mind and world to forge an unapologetic life, inspiring countless others — like me, and maybe even you — to do the same.

vox: To Carrie Fisher, a woman who knew the power of accepting yourself without apology Carrie Fisher spent a lifetime fighting people’s exp...