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Tumblr, Blog, and Flickr: ierussy: MCR @ Santiago, Chile by Felipeborder (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
Tumblr, Blog, and Flickr: ierussy:


MCR @ Santiago, Chile

by Felipeborder (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

ierussy: MCR @ Santiago, Chile by Felipeborder (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Anaconda, Life, and Period: The World as 100 People over the last two centuries Our World in Data Extreme Povert Democracy 6 not living in extreme poverty 90 not living in extreme poverty 99 not living in a democracy 44 not living in a democracy 56 livi İVİng in a democracy 94 living in extreme poverty 10 living in extreme poverty 1 living in a democracy 1820 1840 1860 1880 1900 920 940 960 1960 2000 2015 1820 1840 1860 1880 900 920 940 960 1960 2000 2015 Basic Education Vaccination against diphtherio, pertussis (whooping cough), and tetanus 14 have not attained any education 14 not vaccinated 83 have not attained any education 86 vaccinated 86 have basic education or more 17 have basic 0 vaccinated education or more 1820 1840 1860 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 190 2000 2015 1820 1840 80 8 900 1920 940 1960 1980 2000 2015 Literacy Child Mortality 15 are not able to read 57 survive the first 5 years of life 96 survive the first 5 years of life 88 are not able to read 85 are able to read 43 die before they are 5 years old 12 are able to read 4 die before they are 5 years old 1820 1840 1860 1880 900 920 940 1960 90 2000 2014 1820 1840 160 1880 900 920 1940 960 960 2000 2015 7.4 Blition Data sources: Extreme Poverty: 8 urguignon & Morrison (2002) up to 1970 world Bank 1981 and later 2015 is a projection). Vaccination: WHO (Global data are available for 1980 to 2015-the DPT3 vaccination was licenced in 1949) Education: OECD for the period 1820 to 1960. IIASA for the time thereafter Literacy: OECD for the period 1820 to 1990. UNESCO for 2004 and later The world population increased 6.8-fold over these 2 centuries All these visualizations are from OurWorldInData.org an online publication that presents the empirical evidence on how the world is changing. calcluation of global population share De Colonialism: Wimmer and Min (own calcluation of global population share) Continent: HYDE database Child mortality: up to 1960 own caluclations based on Gapminder; World Bank thereafter cracy Politiy Ⅳ index o 1.7 8on 1.1 8on Licensed under CC-BY-SA by the author Max Roser. 820 <p><a href="http://www.americaninfographic.com/post/164006123389/getting-better" class="tumblr_blog">americaninfographic</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://ourworldindata.org">Getting Better</a></p></blockquote>
Anaconda, Life, and Period: The World as 100 People
 over the last two centuries
 Our World
 in Data
 Extreme Povert
 Democracy
 6 not living in
 extreme poverty
 90 not living in
 extreme poverty
 99 not living
 in a democracy
 44 not living
 in a democracy
 56 livi
 İVİng
 in a democracy
 94 living in
 extreme poverty
 10 living in
 extreme poverty
 1 living
 in a democracy
 1820 1840 1860 1880 1900 920 940 960 1960 2000 2015
 1820 1840 1860 1880 900 920 940 960 1960 2000 2015
 Basic Education
 Vaccination against diphtherio, pertussis (whooping cough), and tetanus
 14 have not attained
 any education
 14 not vaccinated
 83 have not attained
 any education
 86 vaccinated
 86 have basic
 education or more
 17 have basic
 0 vaccinated
 education or more
 1820 1840 1860 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 190 2000 2015
 1820 1840 80 8 900 1920 940 1960 1980 2000 2015
 Literacy
 Child Mortality
 15 are not able
 to read
 57 survive the first
 5 years of life
 96 survive the
 first 5 years of life
 88 are not able
 to read
 85 are able
 to read
 43 die before they
 are 5 years old
 12 are able
 to read
 4 die before they
 are 5 years old
 1820 1840 1860 1880 900 920 940 1960 90 2000 2014
 1820 1840 160 1880 900 920 1940 960 960 2000 2015
 7.4 Blition
 Data sources:
 Extreme Poverty: 8 urguignon & Morrison (2002) up to 1970 world Bank 1981 and later 2015 is a projection).
 Vaccination: WHO (Global data are available for 1980 to 2015-the DPT3 vaccination was licenced in 1949)
 Education: OECD for the period 1820 to 1960. IIASA for the time thereafter
 Literacy: OECD for the period 1820 to 1990. UNESCO for 2004 and later
 The world population
 increased 6.8-fold
 over these 2 centuries
 All these visualizations are from OurWorldInData.org an online
 publication that presents the empirical evidence on how the
 world is changing.
 calcluation of global population share
 De
 Colonialism: Wimmer and Min (own calcluation of global population share)
 Continent: HYDE database
 Child mortality: up to 1960 own caluclations based on Gapminder; World Bank thereafter
 cracy
 Politiy Ⅳ index
 o
 1.7 8on
 1.1 8on
 Licensed under CC-BY-SA by the author Max Roser.
 820
<p><a href="http://www.americaninfographic.com/post/164006123389/getting-better" class="tumblr_blog">americaninfographic</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="https://ourworldindata.org">Getting Better</a></p></blockquote>

americaninfographic: Getting Better

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441/fossil-image-cc-by-nc-40-autumn-colored-fossil" class="tumblr_blog">eclecticirony</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p><h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2><p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p><p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p><p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p></blockquote>
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441/fossil-image-cc-by-nc-40-autumn-colored-fossil" class="tumblr_blog">eclecticirony</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p><h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2><p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p><p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p><p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p></blockquote>

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil LeafWho has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at to...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441/fossil-image-cc-by-nc-40-autumn-colored-fossil" class="tumblr_blog">eclecticirony</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p><h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2><p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p><p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p><p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p></blockquote>
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441/fossil-image-cc-by-nc-40-autumn-colored-fossil" class="tumblr_blog">eclecticirony</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p><h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2><p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p><p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p><p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p></blockquote>

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil LeafWho has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at to...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441">eclecticirony</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p> <h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2> <p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p> <p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p> <p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p> </blockquote>
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441">eclecticirony</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p>
<h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2>
<p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p>
<p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p>
<p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p>
</blockquote>

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441">eclecticirony</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p> <h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2> <p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p> <p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p> <p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p> </blockquote>
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441">eclecticirony</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p>
<h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2>
<p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p>
<p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p>
<p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p>
</blockquote>

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves. Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron. The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: eclecticirony:

Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 
Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf
Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.
Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.
The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old Eocene elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...

Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441">eclecticirony</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p> <h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2> <p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p> <p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p> <p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p> </blockquote>
Energy, Fall, and Tumblr: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://eclecticirony.tumblr.com/post/130482745441">eclecticirony</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 </p>
<h2><b>Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf</b></h2>
<p>Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at too small or large of a latitude? By late summer, trees have sensed the shortened days, and begin turning off some genes and turning off others, which in turn beginning shutting down photosynthetic energy production. Turning water and carbon dioxide into energy by photosynthesis requires a lot of the green pigment chlorophyll. Essentially, the tree turns off the chlorophyll that is so abundant that most leaves are green during the growing season. As the chlorophyll is used up and not replaced, remaining color pigments always present come to dominate. One of those is beta-Carotene (lower left molecule), the strong orange pigment that makes carrots and pumpkins orange, and your skin orange too if you eat enough carrots and pumpkins.  Hence, the orange in autumn leaves.</p>
<p>Fossil leaves are normally brown, though they can be quite detailed showing venation. The fossil leaf above is uncommonly colored, displaying autumn-like colors, but for entirely different reasons than live plants. During fossilization, organic material is replaced with minerals, and the fossil then displays the corresponding mineral colors. The red coloration above is likely due to the presence of iron.</p>
<p>The fossil above is a 2 inch long, 50 million year old <a href="http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/GeologicalTime.htm">Eocene </a>elm leaf from the Tranquil Shale in British Columbia, Canada.<br/></p>
</blockquote>

eclecticirony: Fossil Image CC BY-NC 4.0 Autumn Colored Fossil Leaf Who has not seen stunning displays of fall leaves, unless you live at ...