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Driving: monkey-in-glasses: this real life driving simulator is too real
Driving: monkey-in-glasses:
this real life driving simulator is too real

monkey-in-glasses: this real life driving simulator is too real

Driving: blackwitchmagicwoman: auroraluciferi: askmace: scholarlyapproach: DON’T LET THIS HAPPEN TO CEREAL!!! Listen in the past the poor have had to improvise cheap food the rich never wanted as a means to survive. And over the many years of innovation made the food taste good until eventually the rich where like: “Oh hay you actually like that garbage? Why on earth would you like it?” Then they try it, love it, start buying it, and then drive the price up so much it becomes a luxury good. They do this and its devastating, the food typically never becomes affordable again. It don’t matter how cheap the foo dis to produce, it doesn’t matter if there is almost no meat on the bone or its super difficult to eat and messy. Once the poor discover how to make some bit of cheap food taste good, the rich take it away via driving the price of it up. THEY DID THIS TO RIBS. Ribs were garage meat. Just look at them, there is hardly any meat on the bone, you have to eat them by hand usually, and they are messy. They where an undesirable cheap source of junk meat. But the poor being the poor made them taste good. (Because they don’t have much to choose from.) The rich discovered the meals the poor made with them and decided they liked ribs too. People discovered they could sell a few ribs to rich people and make way more money then selling lots of ribs to poor people and the price was driven up. DON’T LET THIS HAPPEN TO CEREAL!!! They did the same to brisket.  You used to be able to get brisket for less than a dollar a pound, which meant you could get a twenty pound brisket fairly cheaply.  And then you smoked it, sliced it, and had meat for weeks if not a full month.  And it was tasty.  I grew up eating brisket at least once a month because my family could afford it. It was a cheap meat because no rich person looks at the dangly part of the neck of a cow and goes ‘ooh, that looks tasty!’. But then Food Network started showcasing things like barbecued brisket.  Rich people started showing up at places that weren’t just Rib Crib to get their barbeque.  And the price of brisket went up.  A lot. I regularly see it for over five dollars a pound in stores now.  And while yeah, that might not seem like a lot when you’re talking only a pound or two of meat, brisket is normally sold in ten to twenty pound sizes.  It’s become completely unaffordable to the people that made it delicious. Sushi used to be really cheap, too, until it became ‘trendy’.  Guess why you’re now paying twelve dollars for your order of California rolls?  Because rich people discovered something that poor people had been eating for ages. Noticed the prices of fajita meat, chicken thighs, or ham hocks has gone up recently?  You guessed it.  Rich people are taking our food and now we’re scrambling to afford the things that we grew up eating. Lobster is a perfect example of this phenomenon. For hundreds of years, lobster was regarded as a sort of insect larvae from the depth of the sea. It had zero appeal as a “luxury food” until people living in NY and Boston developed a taste for it. Before the 19th century, it was considered a “poverty food” or used as fertilizer and bait - some household servants specified in employment agreements that they would not eat lobster more than twice a week.It was also commonly served at prisons, which tells you something about prison food. Only by cleverly marketing lobster as an indulgence for the privileged made it cost so much. It became a vehicle for enormous profit spawning a multi-billion dollar global industry in the process. This mythical affection for lobster flesh - not its practical value in terms of taste, nutrition, or any other reasonable consideration - drives its value. LMAO. Wait.
Driving: blackwitchmagicwoman:
auroraluciferi:

askmace:

scholarlyapproach:

DON’T LET THIS HAPPEN TO CEREAL!!!
Listen in the past the poor have had to improvise cheap food the rich never wanted as a means to survive. And over the many years of innovation made the food taste good until eventually the rich where like: “Oh hay you actually like that garbage? Why on earth would you like it?” Then they try it, love it, start buying it, and then drive the price up so much it becomes a luxury good.
They do this and its devastating, the food typically never becomes affordable again. It don’t matter how cheap the foo dis to produce, it doesn’t matter if there is almost no meat on the bone or its super difficult to eat and messy. Once the poor discover how to make some bit of cheap food taste good, the rich take it away via driving the price of it up.
THEY DID THIS TO RIBS.
Ribs were garage meat. Just look at them, there is hardly any meat on the bone, you have to eat them by hand usually, and they are messy. They where an undesirable cheap source of junk meat. But the poor being the poor made them taste good. (Because they don’t have much to choose from.) The rich discovered the meals the poor made with them and decided they liked ribs too. People discovered they could sell a few ribs to rich people and make way more money then selling lots of ribs to poor people and the price was driven up.
DON’T LET THIS HAPPEN TO CEREAL!!!

They did the same to brisket.  You used to be able to get brisket for less than a dollar a pound, which meant you could get a twenty pound brisket fairly cheaply.  And then you smoked it, sliced it, and had meat for weeks if not a full month.  And it was tasty.  I grew up eating brisket at least once a month because my family could afford it.
It was a cheap meat because no rich person looks at the dangly part of the neck of a cow and goes ‘ooh, that looks tasty!’.
But then Food Network started showcasing things like barbecued brisket.  Rich people started showing up at places that weren’t just Rib Crib to get their barbeque.  And the price of brisket went up.  A lot.
I regularly see it for over five dollars a pound in stores now.  And while yeah, that might not seem like a lot when you’re talking only a pound or two of meat, brisket is normally sold in ten to twenty pound sizes.  It’s become completely unaffordable to the people that made it delicious.
Sushi used to be really cheap, too, until it became ‘trendy’.  Guess why you’re now paying twelve dollars for your order of California rolls?  Because rich people discovered something that poor people had been eating for ages.
Noticed the prices of fajita meat, chicken thighs, or ham hocks has gone up recently?  You guessed it.  Rich people are taking our food and now we’re scrambling to afford the things that we grew up eating.

Lobster is a perfect example of this phenomenon. For hundreds of years, lobster was regarded as a sort of insect larvae from the depth of the sea. It had zero appeal as a “luxury food” until people living in NY and Boston developed a taste for it. Before the 19th century, it was considered a “poverty food” or used as fertilizer and bait - some household servants specified in employment agreements that they would not eat lobster more than twice a week.It was also commonly served at prisons, which tells you something about prison food.
Only by cleverly marketing lobster as an indulgence for the privileged made it cost so much. It became a vehicle for enormous profit spawning a multi-billion dollar global industry in the process. This mythical affection for lobster flesh - not its practical value in terms of taste, nutrition, or any other reasonable consideration - drives its value. 



LMAO. Wait.

blackwitchmagicwoman: auroraluciferi: askmace: scholarlyapproach: DON’T LET THIS HAPPEN TO CEREAL!!! Listen in the past the poor have...

Driving: What should I absolutely not do when visiting the USA? Charlie Knoles, I have lived in 5 countries and am an Aussie expat in the USA Answered 2d ago + Don't get out of your car ifyou get pulled over by police. I was pulled over by a police officer while driving in Iowa. It was one week afterI had arrived in the USA for the first time. I had accidentally made a minor mistake disobeying a traffic sign. Back home in Australia it's considered polite to get out of your car and walk over to the police officer's car and hand him your license so he doesn't have to get out of his seat. I wanted to be extra polite so I immediately jumped out of my car and walked towards his car while reaching into my back pocket. I'm lucky to be alive. If you come from a gun-free country like the UK or Australia you don't have any natural instinct for gun culture. You don't realize that police assume that everyone is armed. Things got immediately serious. The police officer's hand went to his weapon and I responded by dropping to my knees with my hands up. He yelled a bunch of things at me but my memory is vague because my heartbeat was suddenly pulsing in my ears blotting out all sound. I don't know if he drew his weapon or not. I was staring intently at the ground, shaking and trying to project non- threatening vibes. My next memory is that there were three police cars around me and a bunch of cops who'd been called for backup. They were all keeping their hands close to their guns. After some time passed (a minute? 30 minutes?I have no idea) the tensions de-escalated and they told me to get up. I gave the officer my license and tried to explain why I'd approached him. It was completely incomprehensible to him that there was a place where people don't fear cops and vice versa at traffic stops. It was as though I was trying to tell him that I came from Narnia and our cops were all talking animals. I've spoken to several British people, New Zealanders, and Australians who have shared almost identical stories. They really need to put signs up in all major US airports. Don't get out of your car if stopped by police. They will assume you are armed and they might shoot you. fierceawakening: adelmortescryche: Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some things change when you shift countries. Keep the changes in mind. Whenever I see this I wonder what the gun guys think about it.
Driving: What should I absolutely not do when visiting the USA?
 Charlie Knoles, I have lived in 5 countries and am an Aussie expat in
 the USA
 Answered 2d ago
 +
 Don't get out of your car ifyou get pulled over by police.
 I was pulled over by a police officer while driving in Iowa. It was one week afterI
 had arrived in the USA for the first time. I had accidentally made a minor
 mistake disobeying a traffic sign. Back home in Australia it's considered polite to
 get out of your car and walk over to the police officer's car and hand him your
 license so he doesn't have to get out of his seat. I wanted to be extra polite so I
 immediately jumped out of my car and walked towards his car while reaching
 into my back pocket.
 I'm lucky to be alive.
 If you come from a gun-free country like the UK or Australia you don't have any
 natural instinct for gun culture. You don't realize that police assume that
 everyone is armed.
 Things got immediately serious. The police officer's hand went to his weapon
 and I responded by dropping to my knees with my hands up. He yelled a bunch
 of things at me but my memory is vague because my heartbeat was suddenly
 pulsing in my ears blotting out all sound. I don't know if he drew his weapon or
 not. I was staring intently at the ground, shaking and trying to project non-
 threatening vibes. My next memory is that there were three police cars around
 me and a bunch of cops who'd been called for backup. They were all keeping
 their hands close to their guns. After some time passed (a minute? 30 minutes?I
 have no idea) the tensions de-escalated and they told me to get up. I gave the
 officer my license and tried to explain why I'd approached him. It was completely
 incomprehensible to him that there was a place where people don't fear cops and
 vice versa at traffic stops. It was as though I was trying to tell him that I came
 from Narnia and our cops were all talking animals.
 I've spoken to several British people, New Zealanders, and Australians who have
 shared almost identical stories. They really need to put signs up in all major US
 airports.
 Don't get out of your car if stopped by police. They will assume you are
 armed and they might shoot you.
fierceawakening:
adelmortescryche:
Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some things change when you shift countries. Keep the changes in mind. 

Whenever I see this I wonder what the gun guys think about it.

fierceawakening: adelmortescryche: Reblogging for other diasporic and expat folk. Especially non-caucasian diasporic and expat folk. Some...

Driving: Year in Review t Year in Review 2019 2019 fandom: 2019 is coming to a close, and you know what that means—time to review the year! This is our seventh stint, and we’re doing things a little differently this time around. The biggest change is in how we collect data: this year’s lists account for a full 365 days, from October 21st, 2018 through October 20th, 2019, meaning this is the first time we’re taking data from December into account. Welcome to Year in Review, December!This year, you’ll be treated to 36 lists and five editorial posts that dive a little deeper into certain communities. We’ve expanded a few lists (hello, 100 K-pop stars!) and added some new ones (Movies, Anime, and TV characters!) for your viewing pleasure.It’s all here, all December, all for you. Here’s to another year. For now, here is a master guide to this year’s posts:Best of 2019Top 100 ShipsActressesActorsMoviesMovie CharactersLive-Action TVAnimated TVTV Show CharactersA History of Good Omens SpoilersEditsIncorrect QuotesReality TVTV PersonalitiesPro WrestlersAthletesK-PopK-Pop StarsMusic GroupsSolo ArtistsMusicalsBooksAuthors & PoetsVideo GamesThe Mineblr Renaissance Mobile GamesVideo Game CharactersPokémonAnime & MangaAnime & Manga CharactersWeb CelebritiesWeb SeriesMemesThe Best of Answer Time 2019Tumblr CommunitiesArt StylesBeauty + Fashion BrandsAstrology SignsTumblr and Social Impact in 2019LGBTQIA+ on Tumblr in 2019
Driving: Year in Review
 t
 Year in Review
 2019
 2019
fandom:

2019 is coming to a close, and you know what that means—time to review the year! This is our seventh stint, and we’re doing things a little differently this time around. The biggest change is in how we collect data: this year’s lists account for a full 365 days, from October 21st, 2018 through October 20th, 2019, meaning this is the first time we’re taking data from December into account. Welcome to Year in Review, December!This year, you’ll be treated to 36 lists and five editorial posts that dive a little deeper into certain communities. We’ve expanded a few lists (hello, 100 K-pop stars!) and added some new ones (Movies, Anime, and TV characters!) for your viewing pleasure.It’s all here, all December, all for you. Here’s to another year. For now, here is a master guide to this year’s posts:Best of 2019Top 100 ShipsActressesActorsMoviesMovie CharactersLive-Action TVAnimated TVTV Show CharactersA History of Good Omens SpoilersEditsIncorrect QuotesReality TVTV PersonalitiesPro WrestlersAthletesK-PopK-Pop StarsMusic GroupsSolo ArtistsMusicalsBooksAuthors & PoetsVideo GamesThe Mineblr Renaissance Mobile GamesVideo Game CharactersPokémonAnime & MangaAnime & Manga CharactersWeb CelebritiesWeb SeriesMemesThe Best of Answer Time 2019Tumblr CommunitiesArt StylesBeauty + Fashion BrandsAstrology SignsTumblr and Social Impact in 2019LGBTQIA+ on Tumblr in 2019

fandom: 2019 is coming to a close, and you know what that means—time to review the year! This is our seventh stint, and we’re doing thin...