Drug

🔥 | Latest

Drugs, Jail, and Monopoly: Business An HIV treatment cost taxpavers millions. The government patented it But a pharma giant is making billions Antiretroviral pills Truvada sit on a tray at Jack's Drug Store on Nov. 23, 2010, in San Anselmo, Calif. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) By Christopher Rowland March 26 at 7:26 PM Thomas Folks spent vears in his U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab developing a treatment to block deadly HI co AIDS V in monkeys. Then San Francis researcher Robert Grant, using $50 million in federal grants, proved the treatment worked in people who engaged in risky sex Their work-almost fully funded by U.S toxic-spill: socialistexan: whyyoustabbedme: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/pharma-giant-profits-from-hiv-treatment-funded-by-taxpayers-and-patented-by-the-government 1. Taxpayer-funded research discovers new use for HIV drug; 2. Company w/ monopoly on drug says gov cant patent it; 3. Company makes $3B on drug/year; 4. Taxpayers get no return on investment, ~80% who need treatment dont get it Our capitalist aristocratic elites commit mass murder and treason against the people, and make billions, some black guy gets caught with a joint and goes to jail for years… “American justice” sure is a joke This is incredibly common with pharmaceuticals in the US. Drugs are researched with public funds, patented by the government, but then they are given directly to a private corporation for billions (if not trillions) in profit for that corporation. 210 drugs from 2010 to 2016 benefited from this process. Kill capitalism before it kills humanity.
Drugs, Jail, and Monopoly: Business
 An HIV treatment cost
 taxpavers millions. The
 government patented it
 But a pharma giant is
 making billions
 Antiretroviral pills Truvada sit on a tray at Jack's Drug
 Store on Nov. 23, 2010, in San Anselmo, Calif. (Justin
 Sullivan/Getty Images)
 By Christopher Rowland
 March 26 at 7:26 PM
 Thomas Folks spent vears in his U.S
 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 lab developing a treatment to block deadly
 HI co AIDS
 V in monkeys. Then San Francis
 researcher Robert Grant, using $50 million
 in federal grants, proved the treatment
 worked in people who engaged in risky sex
 Their work-almost fully funded by U.S
toxic-spill:
socialistexan:

whyyoustabbedme:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/pharma-giant-profits-from-hiv-treatment-funded-by-taxpayers-and-patented-by-the-government
1. Taxpayer-funded research discovers new use for HIV drug; 
2. Company w/ monopoly on drug says gov cant patent it; 
3. Company makes $3B on drug/year; 
4. Taxpayers get no return on investment, ~80% who need treatment dont get it



Our capitalist aristocratic elites commit mass murder and treason 
against the people, and make billions, some black guy gets caught with a
 joint and goes to jail for years… “American justice” sure is 
a joke 


This is incredibly common with pharmaceuticals in the US. Drugs are researched with public funds, patented by the government, but then they are given directly to a private corporation for billions (if not trillions) in profit for that corporation. 
210 drugs from 2010 to 2016 benefited from this process. 

Kill capitalism before it kills humanity.

toxic-spill: socialistexan: whyyoustabbedme: https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/pharma-giant-profits-from-hiv-treatment-funde...

Abc, Children, and Doctor: WEAR ABC 3 News, Pensacola shared a V link. 1hr. CVS puts out generic competitor to EpiPen at a 6th the price weartv.com 263 26 Comments 99 Shares Like Comment Share lethargicactionhero: erykahisnotokay: runawayhurricane: totalharmonycycle: southernrepublicangirl: Ah the free market at work. (Similar to when I went to CVS to pickup a 90$ prescription and they had their own generic version for 7.99). This is important! Tell your Friends. I can’t believe some insurances quit covering them 😐 From Slate: The generic Adrenaclick will cost $109.99 for two doses, compared with $649.99 for the same amount of drug in an EpiPen. That’s good news, both for financial and safety reasons: STAT reported last year that some parents and institutions had begun filling up syringes with epinephrine as a cost-cutting measure, a DIY solution that could pose great risk to the children who may have eventually needed injections. A more affordable alternative will help ensure safer epinephrine injections. That’s assuming, though, that the people who need these devices know exactly what to ask for when they’re sitting in their doctors’ offices. Otherwise, they’ll still be stuck with the overpriced product. Here’s why: The mechanism by which Adrenaclick injects the drug is slightly different from EpiPen’s mechanism, so the Food and Drug Administration has ruled that the two are not therapeutically equivalent. That distinction is important because it means a prescription for an EpiPen cannot be filled with Adrenaclick. If you want the cheaper option, you have to have an Adrenaclick prescription. You must ask your doctor for an Adrenaclick prescription!  I also found a coupon from Impax on 0.15mg and 0.3mg epinephrine injection, USP auto-injectors, which appear to be the generic version of Adrenaclick; these coupons cover up to $100 per pack for 3 packs of these injectors (6 total injectors). Some customers may be automatically eligible for $100 off the retail price thus only paying $10 for a pack, but this may be good backup for those who for whatever reason do not meet those requirements. Pass this information on, potentially save a life.
Abc, Children, and Doctor: WEAR ABC 3 News, Pensacola shared a V
 link.
 1hr.
 CVS puts out generic competitor to EpiPen at a
 6th the price
 weartv.com
 263
 26 Comments 99 Shares
 Like
 Comment
 Share
lethargicactionhero:
erykahisnotokay:

runawayhurricane:

totalharmonycycle:


southernrepublicangirl:

Ah the free market at work.
(Similar to when I went to CVS to pickup a 90$ prescription and they had their own generic version for 7.99).

This is important! Tell your Friends.


I can’t believe some insurances quit covering them 😐

From Slate:
The generic Adrenaclick will cost $109.99 for two doses, compared with $649.99 for the same amount of drug in an EpiPen. That’s good news, both for financial and safety reasons: STAT reported last year that some parents and institutions had begun filling up syringes with epinephrine as a cost-cutting measure, a DIY solution that could pose great risk to the children who may have eventually needed injections. A more affordable alternative will help ensure safer epinephrine injections.
That’s assuming, though, that the people who need these devices know exactly what to ask for when they’re sitting in their doctors’ offices. Otherwise, they’ll still be stuck with the overpriced product. Here’s why: The mechanism by which Adrenaclick injects the drug is slightly different from EpiPen’s mechanism, so the Food and Drug Administration has ruled that the two are not therapeutically equivalent. That distinction is important because it means a prescription for an EpiPen cannot be filled with Adrenaclick. If you want the cheaper option, you have to have an Adrenaclick prescription.
You must ask your doctor for an Adrenaclick prescription! 
I also found a coupon from Impax on 0.15mg and 0.3mg epinephrine injection, USP auto-injectors, which appear to be the generic version of Adrenaclick; these coupons cover up to $100 per pack for 3 packs of these injectors (6 total injectors).
Some customers may be automatically eligible for $100 off the retail price thus only paying $10 for a pack, but this may be good backup for those who for whatever reason do not meet those requirements.

Pass this information on, potentially save a life.

lethargicactionhero: erykahisnotokay: runawayhurricane: totalharmonycycle: southernrepublicangirl: Ah the free market at work. (Similar...