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equality: Chocolate equality
equality: Chocolate equality

Chocolate equality

equality: Equality sounds nice
equality: Equality sounds nice

Equality sounds nice

equality: Equality sounds nice by mrniceboiz MORE MEMES
equality: Equality sounds nice by mrniceboiz
MORE MEMES

Equality sounds nice by mrniceboiz MORE MEMES

equality: Wow. So much equality and respect.
equality: Wow. So much equality and respect.

Wow. So much equality and respect.

equality: Equality gang where ya at
equality: Equality gang where ya at

Equality gang where ya at

equality: Equality gang where ya at
equality: Equality gang where ya at

Equality gang where ya at

equality: I strive for true gender equality
equality: I strive for true gender equality

I strive for true gender equality

equality: Equality vs. Equity
equality: Equality vs. Equity

Equality vs. Equity

equality: tumblr Year in Review Social Impact 2019 2019 fandom: Tumblr and Social Impact in 2019For 2019, our Social Impact team (@action​) compiled trends they saw across the platform. From #BlackExcellence365 to National Hispanic Heritage Month, there’s no doubt that Tumblr’s community is incredibly passionate about and dedicated to social issues. During Women’s History Month, we shared stories from Black women, trans people, women of color, and more from all industries in threads that continued throughout the year. The tag #postitforward was where many of you shared mental health stories, uplifting others in an honest and raw way. The community mobilized for climate change with the hashtag #FridaysForFuture, rose to honor new communities during our first ever #APAHM campaign, and celebrated all things LGBTQ+ year-round with #tumblr pride!When we looked at all of the data, we weren’t surprised at which issues are the most important to you, the Tumblr community. You all engaged in these conversations and put action into your words. Whether you created art, wrote, edited GIFs, or posted selfies as part of your activism, you showed up. While this list is ranked by engagement volume, there is no value judgment as to the importance of any one issue over the other.Mental healthBlack cultureFeminismPride monthEqualityIntersectional feminismClimate changeCapitalism Racism Blackout Stay passionate, Tumblr. Keep making actual change in this world, through all of the 2020s. 
equality: tumblr Year in Review
 Social Impact
 2019
 2019
fandom:

Tumblr and Social Impact in 2019For 2019, our Social Impact team (@action​) compiled trends they saw across the platform. From #BlackExcellence365 to National Hispanic Heritage Month, there’s no doubt that Tumblr’s community is incredibly passionate about and dedicated to social issues. During Women’s History Month, we shared stories from Black women, trans people, women of color, and more from all industries in threads that continued throughout the year. The tag #postitforward was where many of you shared mental health stories, uplifting others in an honest and raw way. The community mobilized for climate change with the hashtag #FridaysForFuture, rose to honor new communities during our first ever #APAHM campaign, and celebrated all things LGBTQ+ year-round with #tumblr pride!When we looked at all of the data, we weren’t surprised at which issues are the most important to you, the Tumblr community. You all engaged in these conversations and put action into your words. Whether you created art, wrote, edited GIFs, or posted selfies as part of your activism, you showed up. While this list is ranked by engagement volume, there is no value judgment as to the importance of any one issue over the other.Mental healthBlack cultureFeminismPride monthEqualityIntersectional feminismClimate changeCapitalism Racism Blackout Stay passionate, Tumblr. Keep making actual change in this world, through all of the 2020s. 

fandom: Tumblr and Social Impact in 2019For 2019, our Social Impact team (@action​) compiled trends they saw across the platform. From #...

equality: EmbraceRace Yesterday at 12:00 PM embracerace Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. Equality Equity momo-de-avis: aloneindarknes7: calystarose: Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. This is something that I teach my students during the first week of school and they understand it. Eight year olds can understand this and all it costs is a box of band-aids. I have each students pretend they got hurt and need a band-aid. Children love band-aids. I ask the first one where they are hurt. If he says his finger, I put the band-aid on his finger. Then I ask the second one where they are hurt. No matter what that child says, I put the band-aid on their finger exactly like the first child. I keep doing that through the whole class. No matter where they say their pretend injury is, I do the same thing I did with the first one. After they all have band-aids in the same spot, I ask if that actually helped any of them other than the first child. I say, “Well, I helped all of you the same! You all have one band-aid!” And they’ll try to get me to understand that they were hurt somewhere else. I act like I’m just now understanding it. Then I explain, “There might be moments this year where some of you get different things because you need them differently, just like you needed a band-aid in a different spot.”  If at any time any of my students ask why one student has a different assignment, or gets taken out of the class for a subject, or gets another teacher to come in and help them throughout the year, I remind my students of the band-aids they got at the start of the school year and they stop complaining. That’s why eight year olds can understand equity.  I remember reading somewhere once “we should be speaking of equity instead of equality” and that is a principle that applies here me thinks
equality: EmbraceRace
 Yesterday at 12:00 PM
 embracerace
 Because treating people fairly often means treating
 them differently.
 Equality
 Equity
momo-de-avis:
aloneindarknes7:

calystarose:
Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently.
This is something that I teach my students during the first week of school and they understand it. Eight year olds can understand this and all it costs is a box of band-aids.
I have each students pretend they got hurt and need a band-aid. Children love band-aids. I ask the first one where they are hurt. If he says his finger, I put the band-aid on his finger. Then I ask the second one where they are hurt. No matter what that child says, I put the band-aid on their finger exactly like the first child. I keep doing that through the whole class. No matter where they say their pretend injury is, I do the same thing I did with the first one.
After they all have band-aids in the same spot, I ask if that actually helped any of them other than the first child. I say, “Well, I helped all of you the same! You all have one band-aid!” And they’ll try to get me to understand that they were hurt somewhere else. I act like I’m just now understanding it. Then I explain, “There might be moments this year where some of you get different things because you need them differently, just like you needed a band-aid in a different spot.” 
If at any time any of my students ask why one student has a different assignment, or gets taken out of the class for a subject, or gets another teacher to come in and help them throughout the year, I remind my students of the band-aids they got at the start of the school year and they stop complaining. That’s why eight year olds can understand equity. 


I remember reading somewhere once “we should be speaking of equity instead of equality” and that is a principle that applies here me thinks

momo-de-avis: aloneindarknes7: calystarose: Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. This is something that...

equality: bi-trans-alliance: Westboro Members Now Live Next To House Painted Colors Of Transgender Flag
equality: bi-trans-alliance:

Westboro Members Now Live Next To House Painted Colors Of Transgender Flag

bi-trans-alliance: Westboro Members Now Live Next To House Painted Colors Of Transgender Flag