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Forever, For, and This: VA My co-worker painted this for me as a parting gift. Im forever changed.
Forever, For, and This: VA
My co-worker painted this for me as a parting gift. Im forever changed.

My co-worker painted this for me as a parting gift. Im forever changed.

Fall, Fucking, and Shakespeare: with his toga and let himself fall.' Suet- onius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: 'Kai su, teknon' (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin Et tu, Brute?). It literally means 'You too, child,' but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn't clear. Tempest cites 'an import- ant article' by James Russell (1980) 'that has often been overlooked'. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar's putative last words were not 'the emotion- al parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son' but more along the lines of See you in hell, punk. pomrania: narramin: what a fucking power move [Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcription follows.] Suetonius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: “Kai su, teknon” (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin “Et tu Brute?”). It literally means “You too, child,” but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn’t clear. Tempest cites “an important article” by James Russell (1980) “that has often been overlooked”. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar’s putative last words were not “the emotional parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son” but more along the lines of “See you in hell, punk.” [End description.]
Fall, Fucking, and Shakespeare: with his toga and let himself fall.' Suet-
 onius adds that, according to some reports,
 he said in Greek: 'Kai su, teknon' (which
 Shakespeare turned into the Latin Et tu,
 Brute?). It literally means 'You too, child,'
 but what Caesar may have intended by the
 words isn't clear. Tempest cites 'an import-
 ant article' by James Russell (1980) 'that
 has often been overlooked'. Russell points
 out that the words kai su often appear on
 curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar's
 putative last words were not 'the emotion-
 al parting declaration of a betrayed man to
 one he had treated like a son' but more
 along the lines of See you in hell, punk.
pomrania:
narramin:
what a fucking power move
[Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcription follows.]
Suetonius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: “Kai su, teknon” (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin “Et tu Brute?”). It literally means “You too, child,” but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn’t clear. Tempest cites “an important article” by James Russell (1980) “that has often been overlooked”. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar’s putative last words were not “the emotional parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son” but more along the lines of “See you in hell, punk.”
[End description.]

pomrania: narramin: what a fucking power move [Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcrip...

Fall, Fucking, and Shakespeare: with his toga and let himself fall.' Suet- onius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: 'Kai su, teknon' (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin Et tu, Brute?). It literally means 'You too, child,' but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn't clear. Tempest cites 'an import- ant article' by James Russell (1980) 'that has often been overlooked'. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar's putative last words were not 'the emotion- al parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son' but more along the lines of See you in hell, punk. pomrania: narramin: what a fucking power move [Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcription follows.] Suetonius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: “Kai su, teknon” (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin “Et tu Brute?”). It literally means “You too, child,” but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn’t clear. Tempest cites “an important article” by James Russell (1980) “that has often been overlooked”. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar’s putative last words were not “the emotional parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son” but more along the lines of “See you in hell, punk.” [End description.]
Fall, Fucking, and Shakespeare: with his toga and let himself fall.' Suet-
 onius adds that, according to some reports,
 he said in Greek: 'Kai su, teknon' (which
 Shakespeare turned into the Latin Et tu,
 Brute?). It literally means 'You too, child,'
 but what Caesar may have intended by the
 words isn't clear. Tempest cites 'an import-
 ant article' by James Russell (1980) 'that
 has often been overlooked'. Russell points
 out that the words kai su often appear on
 curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar's
 putative last words were not 'the emotion-
 al parting declaration of a betrayed man to
 one he had treated like a son' but more
 along the lines of See you in hell, punk.
pomrania:

narramin:
what a fucking power move
[Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcription follows.]
Suetonius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: “Kai su, teknon” (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin “Et tu Brute?”). It literally means “You too, child,” but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn’t clear. Tempest cites “an important article” by James Russell (1980) “that has often been overlooked”. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar’s putative last words were not “the emotional parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son” but more along the lines of “See you in hell, punk.”
[End description.]

pomrania: narramin: what a fucking power move [Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcri...

England, Fucking, and Stephen: A Portrait of James Il's 'Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgovw "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later "improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters, James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers. runawayrat: squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens Im fucking deceased
England, Fucking, and Stephen: A Portrait of James Il's
 'Husband' Has
 Reappeared in
 Glasgovw
 "I desire only to live in this world for
 your sake," the king wrote to him.
 BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017

 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king
 James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and
 the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged
 from conservation work and been authenticated, after
 having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC
 reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham,
 rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye
 at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known
 to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been
 concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later
 "improvements."

 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man
 in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had
 the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and
 James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has
 been a source of some contention. In their letters,
 James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting
 "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have
 argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male
 friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors
 flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in
 one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers.
runawayrat:

squidsticks:

King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband*

Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens


Im fucking deceased

runawayrat: squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: i...

Beautiful, Elf, and Fire: takennnvworst wound at this par, having ooked my last upon thatHaugh henceforth I will call nothing fai which is fairest. iniess it be her gift to me ased her for one hair from her golden head. What was it? She gave me three This is my favorite fucking scene If you've read the Simarillion, you know who Feanor was. If you don't, Feanor was the dickhead who created the Silmarils three indescibably beautiful and magical jewels that contained the light and essence of the world before it became flawed. They were the catalyst for basically every important thing that happened in the First Age of Middle Earth It is thought that the inspiration for the Silmarils came to Feanor from the sight of Galadriel's shining. silver-gold hair He begged her three times for single strand of her beautiful hair. And every time Galadriel refused him. Even when she was young. Galadriels ability to see into other's hearts was very strong, and she knew that Feanor was illed with nothing but fire and greed Fast forward to the end of the Third Age Gimli, visiting Lorien, is also struck by Galadriel's beauty. During the scene where she's passing out her parting gifts to the Fellowship. Galadriel stops empty-handed in front of Gimli, because she doesn t know what to offer a Dwarf Gimli tells her no gold, no treasure.just a single strand of hair to remember her beauty by She gives him three. Three. And this is why Gimli gets to be an Elf Friend, people Because Galadriel looks at him and thinks he deserves what she refused the greatest Elf who ever lived and then twice that. And because he has no idea of the significance of what she's just given him, but he's going to treasure it the rest of his life anyway Just look at that smile on Legolas's face in the last panel. He gets it. He knows the backstory. And I'm pretty sure this is the moment he reconsiders whether Elves and Dwarves can't be friends after all Everyone look at this great fucking post maire awesome pictures at THEMETAPICTURE.COM Not mine but wow
Beautiful, Elf, and Fire: takennnvworst wound at this
 par, having ooked my last upon thatHaugh henceforth I will call nothing fai
 which is fairest.
 iniess it be her gift to me
 ased her for one hair from
 her golden head.
 What was it?
 She gave me three
 This is my favorite fucking scene
 If you've read the Simarillion, you know who Feanor was. If you don't, Feanor was the dickhead who
 created the Silmarils three indescibably beautiful and magical jewels that contained the light and
 essence of the world before it became flawed. They were the catalyst for basically every important
 thing that happened in the First Age of Middle Earth
 It is thought that the inspiration for the Silmarils came to Feanor from the sight of Galadriel's shining.
 silver-gold hair
 He begged her three times for single strand of her beautiful hair. And every time Galadriel refused
 him. Even when she was young. Galadriels ability to see into other's hearts was very strong, and she
 knew that Feanor was illed with nothing but fire and greed
 Fast forward to the end of the Third Age
 Gimli, visiting Lorien, is also struck by Galadriel's beauty. During the scene where she's passing out
 her parting gifts to the Fellowship. Galadriel stops empty-handed in front of Gimli, because she
 doesn t know what to offer a Dwarf Gimli tells her no gold, no treasure.just a single strand of hair
 to remember her beauty by
 She gives him three. Three.
 And this is why Gimli gets to be an Elf Friend, people Because Galadriel looks at him and thinks he
 deserves what she refused the greatest Elf who ever lived and then twice that. And because he
 has no idea of the significance of what she's just given him, but he's going to treasure it the rest of
 his life anyway
 Just look at that smile on Legolas's face in the last panel. He gets it. He knows the backstory. And
 I'm pretty sure this is the moment he reconsiders whether Elves and Dwarves can't be friends after
 all
 Everyone look at this great fucking post
 maire awesome pictures at THEMETAPICTURE.COM
Not mine but wow

Not mine but wow

England, Stephen, and Tumblr: squidsticks A Portrait of James l's Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgow "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 0) A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anyone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports, George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied marn in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a “lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting, "that I can scarcely see to write." But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discovery of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it's very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let's not look at this through a 21st century lens Fuente: squidsticks 117,177 notas Dammit straight people
England, Stephen, and Tumblr: squidsticks
 A Portrait of James l's
 Husband' Has
 Reappeared in
 Glasgow
 "I desire only to live in this world for
 your sake," the king wrote to him.
 BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017
 0)

 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king
 James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and
 the one he loved "more than anyone else" has emerged
 from conservation work and been authenticated, after
 having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC
 reports, George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham,
 rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye
 at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known
 to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been
 concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later
 improvements."
 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied marn
 in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had

 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man
 in all of England," with a “lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had
 the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and
 James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has
 been a source of some contention. In their letters
 James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting,
 "that I can scarcely see to write." But scholars have
 argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male
 friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors
 flared up upon the 2008 discovery of a secret passage in
 one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers
 King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room
 to the room of a man he calls his husband*
 Historians: it's very hard to tell what kind of relationship
 they would have had, let's not look at this through a 21st
 century lens
 Fuente: squidsticks
 117,177 notas
Dammit straight people

Dammit straight people

England, Stephen, and Target: A Portrait of James Il's 'Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgovw "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later "improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters, James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers. squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens
England, Stephen, and Target: A Portrait of James Il's
 'Husband' Has
 Reappeared in
 Glasgovw
 "I desire only to live in this world for
 your sake," the king wrote to him.
 BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017

 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king
 James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and
 the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged
 from conservation work and been authenticated, after
 having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC
 reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham,
 rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye
 at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known
 to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been
 concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later
 "improvements."

 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man
 in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had
 the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and
 James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has
 been a source of some contention. In their letters,
 James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting
 "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have
 argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male
 friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors
 flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in
 one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers.
squidsticks:
King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband*

Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens

squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard ...

England, Stephen, and Tumblr: A Portrait of James Il's 'Husband' Has Reappeared in Glasgovw "I desire only to live in this world for your sake," the king wrote to him. BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged from conservation work and been authenticated, after having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later "improvements." In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks, and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I lavished attention and care on him, and called him "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has been a source of some contention. In their letters, James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers. squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens
England, Stephen, and Tumblr: A Portrait of James Il's
 'Husband' Has
 Reappeared in
 Glasgovw
 "I desire only to live in this world for
 your sake," the king wrote to him.
 BY NATASHA FROST SEPTEMBER 25, 2017

 A LOST PORTRAIT OF THE man whom English king
 James I referred to as his "husband," "sweet heart," and
 the one he loved "more than anvone else" has emerged
 from conservation work and been authenticated, after
 having been mistaken for a copy for centuries, the BBC
 reports. George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham,
 rose to prominence in court after catching the king's eye
 at a hunt. This 17th-century painting of him, now known
 to be by the Flemish great Peter Paul Rubens, had been
 concealed by layers of dirt, as well as later
 "improvements."

 In the painting, Villiers is depicted wearing an elaborate
 lace collar and a sash. He was known for his good looks,
 and had been described as "the handsomest-bodied man
 in all of England," with a "lovely complexion." James I
 lavished attention and care on him, and called him
 "Steenie" after St. Stephen, who was said to have had
 the face of an angel. However, whether Villiers and
 James I were lovers in the modern sense of the word has
 been a source of some contention. In their letters,
 James I states how he wept so profusely at their parting
 "that I can scarcelv see to write. But scholars have
 argued that such sentiments are not atypical of male
 friendship in the 17th and 18th centuries. The rumors
 flared up upon the 2008 discoverv of a secret passage in
 one of the king's homes linking their bedchambers.
squidsticks:
King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband*

Historians: it’s very hard to tell what kind of relationship they would have had, let’s not look at this through a 21st century lens

squidsticks: King James I: *builds secret tunnel connecting his room to the room of a man he calls his husband* Historians: it’s very hard ...