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pillar: jojo-licious: sparklyjojos: ah yes the three pillar men
pillar: jojo-licious:
sparklyjojos:

ah yes the three pillar men

jojo-licious: sparklyjojos: ah yes the three pillar men

pillar: Cuando quieres pillar el corona para no ir al cole.
pillar: Cuando quieres pillar el corona para no ir al cole.

Cuando quieres pillar el corona para no ir al cole.

pillar: dmg-thawhale: k-eke:Chilling Hey, @randomnightlordI think I found your cat
pillar: dmg-thawhale:

k-eke:Chilling
Hey, @randomnightlordI think I found your cat

dmg-thawhale: k-eke:Chilling Hey, @randomnightlordI think I found your cat

pillar: alamuts-lair-of-madness: eldritchgentleman: beaky-peartree: picsthatmakeyougohmm: hmmm The Last Supper Jesus and his Ripple Disciples preparing for the fight with Pillar Men.
pillar: alamuts-lair-of-madness:
eldritchgentleman:

beaky-peartree:

picsthatmakeyougohmm:

hmmm

The Last Supper

Jesus and his Ripple Disciples preparing for the fight with Pillar Men.

alamuts-lair-of-madness: eldritchgentleman: beaky-peartree: picsthatmakeyougohmm: hmmm The Last Supper Jesus and his Ripple Disciple...

pillar: yo intentando pillar indirectas
pillar: yo intentando pillar indirectas

yo intentando pillar indirectas

pillar: The Scourging of Jesus at the Pillar (32 AD, Artist Unknown)
pillar: The Scourging of Jesus at the Pillar (32 AD, Artist Unknown)

The Scourging of Jesus at the Pillar (32 AD, Artist Unknown)

pillar: GRIND SMART Here are some tips to grind your way to success (the smart way) ✔️Listen to your instinct. When you’re in a high-paying corporate job, or any other job that makes you feel comfortable, logic can override your emotions and convince you to stay when you aren’t truly happy. If you’re getting a pull deep down that something’s not right, that there has to be more, “I can’t be working this hard and getting this little reward for it,” you’re absolutely right! I would say listen to this gut instinct and do something about it.” ✔️Be smart and strategic. The reality is, most of us can’t leave our jobs with nothing else lined up. Half of Americans are living paycheck-to-paycheck, and paying bills takes precedence over feeling fulfilled. If you want to shift into entrepreneurship, starting your business as a side-hustle may be the most viable option. Be smart. 😉 ✔️Shortcut your success. “Did Millmetor just said to take a shortcut?🤔” Read on… f you’re ready to become an entrepreneur, there are things you can do to accelerate your success and avoid mistakes that most inexperienced entrepreneurs make. The answer: Find a mentor! Consider listening to entrepreneurial podcasts that feature entrepreneurs in your industry, or investing in a coach who will guide you through the ropes of building a business. ✔️Establish goals and realistic timelines. While success doesn’t happen overnight, by tracking your metrics and employing a strategy to grow, you can ensure that you’ll eventually arrive at where you want to be. ✔️Success is a BIG picture, remember that. While generating revenue is essential, it shouldn’t be your only focus. Instead, look at your business as a single pillar of your life. (Other pillars might include relationships, health, and well-being.) Be sure to keep yourself in check and not pour energy into your business at the expense of other pillars. - Enjoyed my post? Drop a comment below and let me know if you want more!👇 - grind hustle millionairementor
pillar: GRIND SMART
Here are some tips to grind your way to success (the smart way) ✔️Listen to your instinct. When you’re in a high-paying corporate job, or any other job that makes you feel comfortable, logic can override your emotions and convince you to stay when you aren’t truly happy. If you’re getting a pull deep down that something’s not right, that there has to be more, “I can’t be working this hard and getting this little reward for it,” you’re absolutely right! I would say listen to this gut instinct and do something about it.” ✔️Be smart and strategic. The reality is, most of us can’t leave our jobs with nothing else lined up. Half of Americans are living paycheck-to-paycheck, and paying bills takes precedence over feeling fulfilled. If you want to shift into entrepreneurship, starting your business as a side-hustle may be the most viable option. Be smart. 😉 ✔️Shortcut your success. “Did Millmetor just said to take a shortcut?🤔” Read on… f you’re ready to become an entrepreneur, there are things you can do to accelerate your success and avoid mistakes that most inexperienced entrepreneurs make. The answer: Find a mentor! Consider listening to entrepreneurial podcasts that feature entrepreneurs in your industry, or investing in a coach who will guide you through the ropes of building a business. ✔️Establish goals and realistic timelines. While success doesn’t happen overnight, by tracking your metrics and employing a strategy to grow, you can ensure that you’ll eventually arrive at where you want to be. ✔️Success is a BIG picture, remember that. While generating revenue is essential, it shouldn’t be your only focus. Instead, look at your business as a single pillar of your life. (Other pillars might include relationships, health, and well-being.) Be sure to keep yourself in check and not pour energy into your business at the expense of other pillars. - Enjoyed my post? Drop a comment below and let me know if you want more!👇 - grind hustle millionairementor

Here are some tips to grind your way to success (the smart way) ✔️Listen to your instinct. When you’re in a high-paying corporate job, or...

pillar: SKILL HARD WORK TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL OF SKILL IN ANYTHING YOU HAVE TO STAND ON A PILLAR OF HARD WORK. OH, I JUST STARTED HERE TALENT & I HARD WORK TALENTHARD WORK owLTURD.com violent-darts: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”. I will qualify this a small but I think important amount, because what it is is actually complicated:  Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better hand-eye coordination. Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better pattern recognition. Or translations of audio input. Or whatever.  What this does is combine with @jelloapocalypse‘s EXTREMELY WELL-OBSERVED COMMENT (If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.) in a way that can be both invisible and give this kind of person a massive leg up while being really discouraging to someone who doesn’t have that wiring.  It doesn’t get to the actual original comic’s level of “oh I just started here”. But let’s take two people called Riley and Kennedy, and we’ll do singing, since that’s what I teach.  Riley and Kennedy have exactly the same kind of background: parents who listen to the radio sometimes, the usual social stuff around popular music of whatever genre, etc, but no formal training. Neither of them sings in a church choir, neither of them falls into a formal disability category, whatever.  The first time Riley shows up in my studio and we sing a really simple song I use as a diagnostic, she gets it mostly right. She can follow the tune; she can hear pitch, and it takes very little work for her to chivvy her voice into matching that pitch as long as there’s not something pulling her off. (In other words: as long as I’m singing the same notes as her and playing them on the piano, and as long a she can hear both herself and those notes).  For Riley the lesson is really fun and validating and she goes home and sings along to her own music for a while and comes back next week with six songs she wants to try learning. And most of her lessons are like that: pretty easy positive feedback. That means Riley “practices” a lot in exactly the way @jelloapocalypse describes, even if she doesn’t think she’s actually practicing (that is, sitting down to sing the songs we’re working on together in a systematic way) at all.  In contrast, the first time Kennedy comes to my studio, she struggles. It’s harder for her to hear the difference between notes, and it’s much harder for her to make her voice actually match the pitch she wants to sing at. When we pull out the diagnostic tune, she mostly manages to drone a few clusters of semi-tones, and while she can hear that she’s Off, it’s actually very hard for her to tell HOW she’s off, or what she should do to correct it.  In most cases, for Kennedy, lessons - and in fact the overall experience of singing - is not fun. It’s not validating. It’s a whole process of Not Being Good, of Doing Things Wrong, and given the way humans are often in casual situations being laughed at. When Kennedy goes home she doesn’t sing along with any music she plays: she keeps her lips pressed together and at best enjoys other people singing (and maybe feels envious and demeaned because she can’t do it).  Now the thing is, the practical “skill” difference for Riley and Kennedy here at the beginning is minimal. But the Rileys will tend (if they like what they’re doing) to ROCKET UP THE SKILL LEVEL, because of the “practice is fun so it’s just the thing I do” - because there is always a bunch of validation and positive reinforcement in the act of doing whatever it is, be it doodling or singing or math.  The Kennedys won’t. In fact if they’re not lucky enough to have a good teacher, and one who can put a lot of this into perspective for them, they will tend to be inhibited. The worst time is when a Riley and a Kennedy are friends and sign up to learn together, and Riley takes off and Kennedy’s left sitting there feeling like she’s somehow Deeply Flawed.   And in fact the whole Doctrine of “It’s Just About How Hard You Work” will in and of itself become part of what inhibits them, because they will watch the Rileys - and even the Annas, Anna in this metaphor being the Totally Normal Student who never really exists - grasp things faster than they do, even if they ARE working hard. And this will HAPPEN. They will watch this reality happen in front of them … and then people say to them “oh, it’s all about how hard you work, dear.” And it’s like being gaslit. (Well, to be fair: it IS being gaslit, just without malice intended on the part of the people doing it.)  And that message is horribly horribly toxic: here Kennedy is, and she IS working hard, but she’s still not progressing as fast as Riley or Anna no matter what she does! But it’s All About Hard Work, right? So that must mean that no matter how hard she THINKS she’s working, she’s actually just lazy, or doesn’t want it enough. It’s clearly a moral flaw in her.  I actually have, personally, really good luck with teaching the Kennedys because I literally have this conversation with them when they come to my studio. I actually outright tell them: firstly, anyone who has working vocal chords can sing. Anyone who has working vocal chords and the ability to distinguish audio pitch can even sing on key in tune! But some people have an easy time learning this and some people have a hard time, and sometimes which it is has some relationship to, say, “early exposure to music” or whatever but sometimes it seems to be utterly fucking random - pure luck of the draw.  You CAN SING. The capability is there. And if you want to we will find out how to make it happen. It might not happen as fast as for some other person, it might take more work, it might take more care, but that’s okay: that’s not your fault, that doesn’t mean you’re NOT working hard, but it does mean that here at the beginning we do things like recalibrate victories, we make your progress about YOU, not about Riley or Anna.  But I’m also not going to gaslight you or make you feel like you’re either delusional or somehow especially So Terrible You Don’t Fit In The Rest Of The World: sure, I’ve got some Riley-types who walk in here, noodle around, and we go on to Art Songs. They exist.  So what? Tall people exist. People with broad shoulders exist. People with dark hair exist. Physical embodiment and neurology hand out luck of the genetic roulette with no interest in outcomes. If you’re born blonde, it’s always going to take more work for you to have brown hair than someone born with brown hair, but much like dyeing your hair to match what you want, we can train the muscles of your voice and the neural pathways for hearing to do what you want.  The differences between Rileys and Kennedys are very small. If Riley didn’t discover she liked singing and Kennedy worked at it for years then no, Riley would not “start out” as good as Kennedy is after those years. And you can be Riley and if you DON’T do the fucking work, the Annas of the world especially will blast past you and leave you in the dust.  But on the other hand the Rileys get this wonderful cycle of positive reinforcement that does often start from a place of their coincidental physical embodiment giving them a slight leg up. And pretending that’s not the case does a big disservice to the Kennedys.  We just absolutely do need to reframe that for what it is (a tiny fundamental difference and then a HELL OF A LOT OF “this is fun so I practice more so I get more validation so I -” and more or less no moral meaning at all), what it doesn’t mean, and how to compensate for it. 
pillar: SKILL
 HARD
 WORK
 TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL
 OF SKILL IN ANYTHING
 YOU HAVE TO STAND ON
 A PILLAR OF HARD WORK.
 OH, I JUST
 STARTED
 HERE
 TALENT & I HARD
 WORK
 TALENTHARD
 WORK
 owLTURD.com
violent-darts:

charlesoberonn:

jelloapocalypse:

These bother me sometimes.
We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.


I will qualify this a small but I think important amount, because what it is is actually complicated: 
Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better hand-eye coordination. Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better pattern recognition. Or translations of audio input. Or whatever. 
What this does is combine with @jelloapocalypse‘s EXTREMELY WELL-OBSERVED COMMENT (If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.) in a way that can be both invisible and give this kind of person a massive leg up while being really discouraging to someone who doesn’t have that wiring. 
It doesn’t get to the actual original comic’s level of “oh I just started here”. But let’s take two people called Riley and Kennedy, and we’ll do singing, since that’s what I teach. 
Riley and Kennedy have exactly the same kind of background: parents who listen to the radio sometimes, the usual social stuff around popular music of whatever genre, etc, but no formal training. Neither of them sings in a church choir, neither of them falls into a formal disability category, whatever. 
The first time Riley shows up in my studio and we sing a really simple song I use as a diagnostic, she gets it mostly right. She can follow the tune; she can hear pitch, and it takes very little work for her to chivvy her voice into matching that pitch as long as there’s not something pulling her off. (In other words: as long as I’m singing the same notes as her and playing them on the piano, and as long a she can hear both herself and those notes). 
For Riley the lesson is really fun and validating and she goes home and sings along to her own music for a while and comes back next week with six songs she wants to try learning. And most of her lessons are like that: pretty easy positive feedback. That means Riley “practices” a lot in exactly the way @jelloapocalypse describes, even if she doesn’t think she’s actually practicing (that is, sitting down to sing the songs we’re working on together in a systematic way) at all. 
In contrast, the first time Kennedy comes to my studio, she struggles. It’s harder for her to hear the difference between notes, and it’s much harder for her to make her voice actually match the pitch she wants to sing at. When we pull out the diagnostic tune, she mostly manages to drone a few clusters of semi-tones, and while she can hear that she’s Off, it’s actually very hard for her to tell HOW she’s off, or what she should do to correct it. 
In most cases, for Kennedy, lessons - and in fact the overall experience of singing - is not fun. It’s not validating. It’s a whole process of Not Being Good, of Doing Things Wrong, and given the way humans are often in casual situations being laughed at. When Kennedy goes home she doesn’t sing along with any music she plays: she keeps her lips pressed together and at best enjoys other people singing (and maybe feels envious and demeaned because she can’t do it). 
Now the thing is, the practical “skill” difference for Riley and Kennedy here at the beginning is minimal. But the Rileys will tend (if they like what they’re doing) to ROCKET UP THE SKILL LEVEL, because of the “practice is fun so it’s just the thing I do” - because there is always a bunch of validation and positive reinforcement in the act of doing whatever it is, be it doodling or singing or math. 
The Kennedys won’t. In fact if they’re not lucky enough to have a good teacher, and one who can put a lot of this into perspective for them, they will tend to be inhibited. The worst time is when a Riley and a Kennedy are friends and sign up to learn together, and Riley takes off and Kennedy’s left sitting there feeling like she’s somehow Deeply Flawed. 
 And in fact the whole Doctrine of “It’s Just About How Hard You Work” will in and of itself become part of what inhibits them, because they will watch the Rileys - and even the Annas, Anna in this metaphor being the Totally Normal Student who never really exists - grasp things faster than they do, even if they ARE working hard. And this will HAPPEN. They will watch this reality happen in front of them … and then people say to them “oh, it’s all about how hard you work, dear.” And it’s like being gaslit. (Well, to be fair: it IS being gaslit, just without malice intended on the part of the people doing it.) 
And that message is horribly horribly toxic: here Kennedy is, and she IS working hard, but she’s still not progressing as fast as Riley or Anna no matter what she does! But it’s All About Hard Work, right? So that must mean that no matter how hard she THINKS she’s working, she’s actually just lazy, or doesn’t want it enough. It’s clearly a moral flaw in her. 
I actually have, personally, really good luck with teaching the Kennedys because I literally have this conversation with them when they come to my studio. I actually outright tell them: firstly, anyone who has working vocal chords can sing. Anyone who has working vocal chords and the ability to distinguish audio pitch can even sing on key in tune! But some people have an easy time learning this and some people have a hard time, and sometimes which it is has some relationship to, say, “early exposure to music” or whatever but sometimes it seems to be utterly fucking random - pure luck of the draw. 
You CAN SING. The capability is there. And if you want to we will find out how to make it happen. It might not happen as fast as for some other person, it might take more work, it might take more care, but that’s okay: that’s not your fault, that doesn’t mean you’re NOT working hard, but it does mean that here at the beginning we do things like recalibrate victories, we make your progress about YOU, not about Riley or Anna. 
But I’m also not going to gaslight you or make you feel like you’re either delusional or somehow especially So Terrible You Don’t Fit In The Rest Of The World: sure, I’ve got some Riley-types who walk in here, noodle around, and we go on to Art Songs. They exist. 
So what? Tall people exist. People with broad shoulders exist. People with dark hair exist. Physical embodiment and neurology hand out luck of the genetic roulette with no interest in outcomes. If you’re born blonde, it’s always going to take more work for you to have brown hair than someone born with brown hair, but much like dyeing your hair to match what you want, we can train the muscles of your voice and the neural pathways for hearing to do what you want. 
The differences between Rileys and Kennedys are very small. If Riley didn’t discover she liked singing and Kennedy worked at it for years then no, Riley would not “start out” as good as Kennedy is after those years. And you can be Riley and if you DON’T do the fucking work, the Annas of the world especially will blast past you and leave you in the dust. 
But on the other hand the Rileys get this wonderful cycle of positive reinforcement that does often start from a place of their coincidental physical embodiment giving them a slight leg up. And pretending that’s not the case does a big disservice to the Kennedys. 
We just absolutely do need to reframe that for what it is (a tiny fundamental difference and then a HELL OF A LOT OF “this is fun so I practice more so I get more validation so I -” and more or less no moral meaning at all), what it doesn’t mean, and how to compensate for it. 

violent-darts: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic...

pillar: yo intentando pillar indirectas
pillar: yo intentando pillar indirectas

yo intentando pillar indirectas

pillar: THE PILLAR MEN 2 THEY USE THE TO BEAM K NOWLAGE <p>made by yours truly, to tell you all the pillar men arent that bad, they just want to use the tower of power to make you s m a r t</p>
pillar: THE PILLAR MEN
 2
 THEY USE THE
 TO BEAM
 K NOWLAGE
<p>made by yours truly, to tell you all the pillar men arent that bad, they just want to use the tower of power to make you s m a r t</p>

<p>made by yours truly, to tell you all the pillar men arent that bad, they just want to use the tower of power to make you s m a r t</p>

pillar: You gonna be good <p><a href="https://smallbore.tumblr.com/post/167572880273/everyendeavor-westafricanbaby" class="tumblr_blog">smallbore</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://everyendeavor.tumblr.com/post/167531898142" class="tumblr_blog">everyendeavor</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="https://westafricanbaby.tumblr.com/post/167311384628/diaryofakanemem-this-father-consoling-his-baby" class="tumblr_blog">westafricanbaby</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://diaryofakanemem.tumblr.com/post/167255593488/this-father-consoling-his-baby-son-at-the-doctors" class="tumblr_blog">diaryofakanemem</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><i>This father consoling his baby son at the doctor’s office is SO CUTE 😍<i>😍</i><i>😍</i></i><br/></p></blockquote> <p>Awwwww😂😂😂</p> </blockquote> <p>This father is doing SO much more than consoling his infant son …</p> <p>• this father is showing up as a pillar of safety; he’s told his son he acknowledges and believes in the boy’s strength. </p> <p>• the father is completely present and accepting of his son’s story and helps him tell it. When the son recognizes that his father was fully present and heard the story of his experience of pain, the boy calms completely. </p> <p>This piece of video will now be at the very top of my teaching tools when training parents and caretakers to work with shock and trauma in infants. It’s one of the finest examples of exemplary parenting I have ever seen in my 35-year healing career. ❤️</p> </blockquote> <p>Why! Because he’s black??? You bunch of racist!</p></blockquote> <p>Are you drunk?</p>
pillar: You gonna be good
<p><a href="https://smallbore.tumblr.com/post/167572880273/everyendeavor-westafricanbaby" class="tumblr_blog">smallbore</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://everyendeavor.tumblr.com/post/167531898142" class="tumblr_blog">everyendeavor</a>:</p><blockquote>
<p><a href="https://westafricanbaby.tumblr.com/post/167311384628/diaryofakanemem-this-father-consoling-his-baby" class="tumblr_blog">westafricanbaby</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://diaryofakanemem.tumblr.com/post/167255593488/this-father-consoling-his-baby-son-at-the-doctors" class="tumblr_blog">diaryofakanemem</a>:</p>
<blockquote><p><i>This father consoling his baby son at the doctor’s office is SO CUTE 😍<i>😍</i><i>😍</i></i><br/></p></blockquote>

<p>Awwwww😂😂😂</p>
</blockquote>

<p>This father is doing SO much more than consoling his infant son …</p>
<p>• this father is showing up as a pillar of safety; he’s told his son he acknowledges and believes in the boy’s strength. </p>
<p>• the father is completely present and accepting of his son’s story and helps him tell it. When the son recognizes that his father was fully present and heard the story of his experience of pain, the boy calms completely. </p>
<p>This piece of video will now be at the very top of my teaching tools when training parents and caretakers to work with shock and trauma in infants. It’s one of the finest examples of exemplary parenting I have ever seen in my 35-year healing career. ❤️</p>
</blockquote>

<p>Why! Because he’s black??? You bunch of racist!</p></blockquote>

<p>Are you drunk?</p>

<p><a href="https://smallbore.tumblr.com/post/167572880273/everyendeavor-westafricanbaby" class="tumblr_blog">smallbore</a>:</p> <blockq...

pillar: WELCOME TO PILLAR <p>Submission by <a class="tumblelog" href="https://tmblr.co/mcBDZh-pJ7G-M_Vo1tpz8nQ">@thevertigomaster</a></p>
pillar: WELCOME
 TO PILLAR
<p>Submission by <a class="tumblelog" href="https://tmblr.co/mcBDZh-pJ7G-M_Vo1tpz8nQ">@thevertigomaster</a></p>

<p>Submission by <a class="tumblelog" href="https://tmblr.co/mcBDZh-pJ7G-M_Vo1tpz8nQ">@thevertigomaster</a></p>

pillar: SKILL HARD WORK TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL OF SKILL IN ANYTHING YOU HAVE TO STAND ON A PILLAR OF HARD WORK. OH, I JUST STARTED HERE TALENT & I HARD WORK TALENTHARD WORK owLTURD.com actualaster: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”. Wrong! Talent exists! The problem is that people assume talent means a magical ability to never work hard to get great results and that’s really not what a talent is. Skill is the result of the effort put in to learn and master things. Talent is the measure of how much effort it takes different people to reach the same level of skill. Some people just naturally are able to better grasp, retain, and hone certain concepts needed to develop a skill more easily than others. Some people naturally find some things harder than average to understand, retain, and build on. Two people of a similar skill level will have different amounts of work they needed to get to that point depending on talent. For some people, the amount of effort is significantly less. For some people it’s significantly more. That’s what talent is. Raw talent doesn’t mean a person is going to always do better, or never has to work at a skill. If they never do, then those who dedicate themselves to practice and hard work will surpass them with ease. Tl;dr: Talent is real, but it’s a measure of how much effort was needed to reach a given level of skill, not a replacement for hard work to hone said skill.
pillar: SKILL
 HARD
 WORK
 TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL
 OF SKILL IN ANYTHING
 YOU HAVE TO STAND ON
 A PILLAR OF HARD WORK.
 OH, I JUST
 STARTED
 HERE
 TALENT & I HARD
 WORK
 TALENTHARD
 WORK
 owLTURD.com
actualaster:
charlesoberonn:

jelloapocalypse:

These bother me sometimes.
We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.



Wrong!
Talent exists!
The problem is that people assume talent means a magical ability to never work hard to get great results and that’s really not what a talent is.
Skill is the result of the effort put in to learn and master things.
Talent is the measure of how much effort it takes different people to reach the same level of skill.
Some people just naturally are able to better grasp, retain, and hone certain concepts needed to develop a skill more easily than others.
Some people naturally find some things harder than average to understand, retain, and build on.
Two people of a similar skill level will have different amounts of work they needed to get to that point depending on talent.
For some people, the amount of effort is significantly less.  For some people it’s significantly more.
That’s what talent is.
Raw talent doesn’t mean a person is going to always do better, or never has to work at a skill.
If they never do, then those who dedicate themselves to practice and hard work will surpass them with ease.
Tl;dr:  Talent is real, but it’s a measure of how much effort was needed to reach a given level of skill, not a replacement for hard work to hone said skill.

actualaster: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ti...

pillar: HOORAY! EM HELPING! <p>Wholesome pillar. via /r/wholesomememes <a href="http://ift.tt/2fvCzzT">http://ift.tt/2fvCzzT</a></p>
pillar: HOORAY!
 EM HELPING!
<p>Wholesome pillar. via /r/wholesomememes <a href="http://ift.tt/2fvCzzT">http://ift.tt/2fvCzzT</a></p>

<p>Wholesome pillar. via /r/wholesomememes <a href="http://ift.tt/2fvCzzT">http://ift.tt/2fvCzzT</a></p>