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Public Transportation: CNN CNN @CNN "What I say I'm gonna do, l'm gonna do to the best of my capabilities," says Walter Carr on why he walked 20 miles to work after his car broke down: "I just wanted to show to my company that I am dedicated just like I said in my interview" cnn.it/2zOYOdS Birmingham, Alabama 9:51 AM CT Via Skype Chattanooga, Tennessee 10:51 AM ET GOING THE EXTRA MILE MAN WALKS 20 MILES TO WORK RECEIVES CEO'S PERSONAL CAR AS A GIFT NN DOW 101.74 NEWSROOM 258 views From CNN Newsroom 10:20 AM 19 Jul 18 dagwolf: killagouge: topsydead: pregnantseinfeld: kittycatdeathtrap: pregnantseinfeld: dagwolf: Vomitous can we please stop pretending this shit is good?!!?! What the fuck!!!!! I don’t understand why this is a bad thing?? whats sold as inspirational here is somebody whose fear of being fired and having their source of food and shelter yanked away from them forced them to push themselves to unhealthy lengths Exactly!!! We’re being told “be like this guy, he puts his company above his physical safety”. It’s a shaming tactic against people who don’t prioritize their employers. He was probably stressed the fuck out and needed serious recuperation after that feat, but they’re treating it like he sent the boss a birthday card. I mean, he got a car out of it. He chose the job knowing how far away it was. This should be more of a condemnation of the lack of good public transportation in the south. This isn’t unique to Alabama, the only reason it’s in the news is because the owner is a decent human being. I’ve been citing the preamble to the IWW constitution a lot lately: “The working class and the employing class have nothing in common.”We must work or perish. All the talk this employee chose the job “knowing how far away it was” is bullshit. That he has to choose a job so difficult to get to is nothing more than fodder for further condemnation of our society.  The charitable act here comes with a hidden agenda, as does the awful media representation of the story.  Charity, especially in this manner, is disempowering, condescending, and re-enforces class. Capitalist charity is always about composing the rich as good, generous, noble while composing the poor as short-sighted beggars always guilty of ending up in need of help, and so parasitic. One better hope that the employer in this story pays his employee enough to afford to properly care for and fuel his new car. Worst of all, charity makes people believe capitalism is good because it puts a very nice mask on the whole oppressive affair. That’s how we should talk about this story. 
Public Transportation: CNN
 CNN
 @CNN
 "What I say I'm gonna do, l'm gonna
 do to the best of my capabilities,"
 says Walter Carr on why he walked
 20 miles to work after his car broke
 down: "I just wanted to show to
 my company that I am dedicated
 just like I said in my interview"
 cnn.it/2zOYOdS
 Birmingham, Alabama
 9:51 AM CT
 Via Skype
 Chattanooga, Tennessee
 10:51 AM ET
 GOING THE EXTRA MILE
 MAN WALKS 20 MILES TO WORK RECEIVES CEO'S PERSONAL CAR AS A GIFT NN
 DOW 101.74
 NEWSROOM
 258 views From CNN Newsroom
 10:20 AM 19 Jul 18
dagwolf:
killagouge:

topsydead:

pregnantseinfeld:


kittycatdeathtrap:

pregnantseinfeld:


dagwolf:
Vomitous
can we please stop pretending this shit is good?!!?! What the fuck!!!!!


I don’t understand why this is a bad thing??

whats sold as inspirational here is somebody whose fear of being fired and having their source of food and shelter yanked away from them forced them to push themselves to unhealthy lengths


Exactly!!! We’re being told “be like this guy, he puts his company above his physical safety”. It’s a shaming tactic against people who don’t prioritize their employers. He was probably stressed the fuck out and needed serious recuperation after that feat, but they’re treating it like he sent the boss a birthday card.


I mean, he got a car out of it. He chose the job knowing how far away it was. This should be more of a condemnation of the lack of good public transportation in the south. This isn’t unique to Alabama, the only reason it’s in the news is because the owner is a decent human being.

I’ve been citing the preamble to the IWW constitution a lot lately:
“The working class and the employing class have nothing in common.”We must work or perish. All the talk this employee chose the job “knowing how far away it was” is bullshit. That he has to choose a job so difficult to get to is nothing more than fodder for further condemnation of our society. 
The charitable act here comes with a hidden agenda, as does the awful media representation of the story. 

 Charity, especially in this manner, is disempowering, condescending, and re-enforces class. Capitalist charity is always about composing the rich as good, generous, noble while composing the poor as short-sighted beggars always guilty of ending up in need of help, and so parasitic. One better hope that the employer in this story pays his employee enough to afford to properly care for and fuel his new car. Worst of all, charity makes people believe capitalism is good because it puts a very nice mask on the whole oppressive affair.
That’s how we should talk about this story. 

dagwolf: killagouge: topsydead: pregnantseinfeld: kittycatdeathtrap: pregnantseinfeld: dagwolf: Vomitous can we please stop preten...

Public Transportation: Bernie Sanders @SenSanders There's no state where a full-time minimum wage worker can afford a one-bedroom apartment at the fair market rent. That's unacceptable. 4/10/17, 3:51 PM 5,379 RETWEETS 14.2K LIKES pidgepitchu: strict-constitutionalist: constitutioncutie: Minimum wage: $7.25 $7.25 x 40 hour full time work week: $290 $290 x 4 weeks per month: $1,160 In every Southern state (didn’t have time to look at the rest of the country) you can find some sort of studio apartment for around $500 per month, sometimes less than that. Why bother lying about something so easily disproven?  Because Bernie Sanders supporters aren’t going to fact check him, and they’ll ignore any contrary evidence that’s presented to them anyways. Things like this really tick me off and It’s not political or anything but it’s the fact that you think all that money is there. Here’s what I mean; That weekly check comes to, according to you, 290. Most places DO NOT pay for your half hour lunch that is required by law. So your beginning number was wrong. $7.25 x 7.5 hours a day x 5 days a week only gets you $271.88.  Most people in America get paid bi-weekly, so let’s double it to get the budget. $543.75. That’s GROSS, not NET. Out of that comes anywhere between 10% and 15% taxes depending on state so we’ll low ball it at 10%. Automatically down to $489.38 a pay check. Now health insurance. Usually anywhere from 70-100 a pay check for the cheapest plans. Again, we’ll low ball and go $70. So now we have $419.39 a paycheck. x 2  = $839.  Eight hundred thirty nine dollars. A MONTH. But again, you seem to think that’s fair. So let’s proceed. You say rent is $500? Okay. This person now has $339 left to buy groceries for the whole month, pay utilities, car payment, car insurance, and gas money to get to work.  Those are the bare needs. You have to eat. You have to pay for heat, water, garbage removal, gas and or electricity because apartments do not always include things and rarely all of the above. Most cities in America do not have public transportation. Mine doesn’t despite the fact that our population is over 15,000 people, not counting a taxi. If you have a car, you have to pay that. If you have a car, legally you have to have car insurance. You have to pay that. You have to have gas in that car to get to work to make that money. Now if you can tell me you can get all of that out of $339 you’re lying. You are so focused on rent that you aren’t thinking about everything else people have to pay for. Rent was an example. This is a breakdown of the budget you gave me and it’s not possible to live off that in 2017 America.  And BECAUSE this person makes over $800 a month, they probably won’t qualify for financial aid or food stamps. $800 is the line in my state where they won’t help you. No food stamps, financial aid, or government housing if you make more than $800 a month.  Why does it bother you that people deserve to live above the poverty line?
Public Transportation: Bernie Sanders
 @SenSanders
 There's no state where a full-time
 minimum wage worker can afford a
 one-bedroom apartment at the fair
 market rent. That's unacceptable.
 4/10/17, 3:51 PM
 5,379 RETWEETS 14.2K LIKES
pidgepitchu:

strict-constitutionalist:

constitutioncutie:


Minimum wage: $7.25
$7.25 x 40 hour full time work week: $290
$290 x 4 weeks per month: $1,160
In every Southern state (didn’t have time to look at the rest of the country) you can find some sort of studio apartment for around $500 per month, sometimes less than that. Why bother lying about something so easily disproven? 


Because Bernie Sanders supporters aren’t going to fact check him, and they’ll ignore any contrary evidence that’s presented to them anyways.

Things like this really tick me off and It’s not political or anything but it’s the fact that you think all that money is there. Here’s what I mean;
That weekly check comes to, according to you, 290. Most places DO NOT pay for your half hour lunch that is required by law. So your beginning number was wrong. $7.25 x 7.5 hours a day x 5 days a week only gets you $271.88. 

 Most people in America get paid bi-weekly, so let’s double it to get the budget. $543.75. That’s GROSS, not NET. Out of that comes anywhere between 10% and 15% taxes depending on state so we’ll low ball it at 10%. Automatically down to $489.38 a pay check. Now health insurance. Usually anywhere from 70-100 a pay check for the cheapest plans. Again, we’ll low ball and go $70. So now we have $419.39 a paycheck. x 2  = $839. 
Eight hundred thirty nine dollars. A MONTH.
But again, you seem to think that’s fair. So let’s proceed. You say rent is $500? Okay. This person now has $339 left to buy groceries for the whole month, pay utilities, car payment, car insurance, and gas money to get to work. 
Those are the bare needs. You have to eat. You have to pay for heat, water, garbage removal, gas and or electricity because apartments do not always include things and rarely all of the above. Most cities in America do not have public transportation. Mine doesn’t despite the fact that our population is over 15,000 people, not counting a taxi. If you have a car, you have to pay that. If you have a car, legally you have to have car insurance. You have to pay that. You have to have gas in that car to get to work to make that money.
Now if you can tell me you can get all of that out of $339 you’re lying.
You are so focused on rent that you aren’t thinking about everything else people have to pay for. Rent was an example. This is a breakdown of the budget you gave me and it’s not possible to live off that in 2017 America. 
And BECAUSE this person makes over $800 a month, they probably won’t qualify for financial aid or food stamps. $800 is the line in my state where they won’t help you. No food stamps, financial aid, or government housing if you make more than $800 a month. 
Why does it bother you that people deserve to live above the poverty line?

pidgepitchu: strict-constitutionalist: constitutioncutie: Minimum wage: $7.25 $7.25 x 40 hour full time work week: $290 $290 x 4 week...