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Served in the Army: dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery. Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says: A World of a Difference George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently. This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3 Say it again for the haters in the back who want to keep pretending that trans people, or even treating trans people with respect is even remotely anything new. 😎 It’s worth mentioning, that this was kinda celebrated as a wonder of the atomic age at the time. “Look at the power of our scientists! Look at what we can do!”You know, back when America was trying to be the leader in scientific advancement.
Served in the Army: dreamsofamadman:

somethingaboutdelia:

cryingalonewithfrankenstein:

This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery.
Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says:
A World of a Difference

George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently.

This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3

Say it again for the haters in the back who want to keep pretending that trans people, or even treating trans people with respect is even remotely anything new. 😎

It’s worth mentioning, that this was kinda celebrated as a wonder of the atomic age at the time. “Look at the power of our scientists! Look at what we can do!”You know, back when America was trying to be the leader in scientific advancement.

dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article fro...

Served in the Army: CITY NEW YORK'S PICTURE NEWSPAPER EX-GI BECOMES BLONDE BEAUTY Operations Transform Bronx Youth A World of a Difference Geare W wrved in the ArmY A] fr twe yeags and as dves loralle discharge in İNL New Gerga ls mere. atal leday ate s a photegnaher in Denrk Parents were in a eter Christine (thats dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery. Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says: A World of a Difference George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently. This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3 Say it again for the haters in the back who want to keep pretending that trans people, or even treating trans people with respect is even remotely anything new. 😎 It’s worth mentioning, that this was kinda celebrated as a wonder of the atomic age at the time. “Look at the power of our scientists! Look at what we can do!”You know, back when America was trying to be the leader in scientific advancement.
Served in the Army: CITY
 NEW YORK'S PICTURE NEWSPAPER
 EX-GI BECOMES
 BLONDE BEAUTY
 Operations Transform Bronx Youth
 A World of a Difference
 Geare W
 wrved in the ArmY A] fr twe yeags and as dves
 loralle discharge in İNL New Gerga ls mere.
 atal leday ate s
 a photegnaher in Denrk Parents were
 in a eter Christine (thats
dreamsofamadman:
somethingaboutdelia:

cryingalonewithfrankenstein:

This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery.
Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says:
A World of a Difference

George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently.

This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3

Say it again for the haters in the back who want to keep pretending that trans people, or even treating trans people with respect is even remotely anything new. 😎

It’s worth mentioning, that this was kinda celebrated as a wonder of the atomic age at the time. “Look at the power of our scientists! Look at what we can do!”You know, back when America was trying to be the leader in scientific advancement.

dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from...

Served in the Army: CITY NEW YORK'S PICTURE NEWSPAPER EX-GI BECOMES BLONDE BEAUTY Operations Transform Bronx Youth A World of a Difference Geare W wrved in the ArmY A] fr twe yeags and as dves loralle discharge in İNL New Gerga ls mere. atal leday ate s a photegnaher in Denrk Parents were in a eter Christine (thats dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery. Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says: A World of a Difference George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently. This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3 Say it again for the haters in the back who want to keep pretending that trans people, or even treating trans people with respect is even remotely anything new. 😎 It’s worth mentioning, that this was kinda celebrated as a wonder of the atomic age at the time. “Look at the power of our scientists! Look at what we can do!”You know, back when America was trying to be the leader in scientific advancement.
Served in the Army: CITY
 NEW YORK'S PICTURE NEWSPAPER
 EX-GI BECOMES
 BLONDE BEAUTY
 Operations Transform Bronx Youth
 A World of a Difference
 Geare W
 wrved in the ArmY A] fr twe yeags and as dves
 loralle discharge in İNL New Gerga ls mere.
 atal leday ate s
 a photegnaher in Denrk Parents were
 in a eter Christine (thats
dreamsofamadman:
somethingaboutdelia:

cryingalonewithfrankenstein:

This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery.
Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says:
A World of a Difference

George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently.

This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3

Say it again for the haters in the back who want to keep pretending that trans people, or even treating trans people with respect is even remotely anything new. 😎

It’s worth mentioning, that this was kinda celebrated as a wonder of the atomic age at the time. “Look at the power of our scientists! Look at what we can do!”You know, back when America was trying to be the leader in scientific advancement.

dreamsofamadman: somethingaboutdelia: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from...

Served in the Army: <p>Black history month day 4: Susie King Taylor</p> <p>Susie Baker King Taylor was an Army nurse in the Civil War, and the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia. As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, she was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. </p> <p>While Georgia had harsh laws against the education of slaves, Susie attended two secret schools taught by black women as a young girl and learned the rudiments of literacy. Later she was educated by two white youths who knowingly broke the law. In April 1862 She and many other African Americans fled to St. Simons Island, occupied at the time by Union forces. While there, her education became known and she was asked to teach at a freedman&rsquo;s school, teaching freed slave children how to read. At night, many adults would also come to her, eager to learn. She eventually married a black Union soldier and served in the army as a nurse, as well as educating the soldiers. </p> <p>For more information, visit this website: <a href="http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912">http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912</a></p>
Served in the Army: <p>Black history month day 4: Susie King Taylor</p>

<p>Susie Baker King Taylor was an Army nurse in the Civil War, and the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia. As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, she was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. </p>

<p>While Georgia had harsh laws against the education of slaves, Susie attended two secret schools taught by black women as a young girl and learned the rudiments of literacy. Later she was educated by two white youths who knowingly broke the law. In April 1862 She and many other African Americans fled to St. Simons Island, occupied at the time by Union forces. While there, her education became known and she was asked to teach at a freedman&rsquo;s school, teaching freed slave children how to read. At night, many adults would also come to her, eager to learn. She eventually married a black Union soldier and served in the army as a nurse, as well as educating the soldiers. </p>

<p>For more information, visit this website: <a href="http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912">http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912</a></p>

<p>Black history month day 4: Susie King Taylor</p> <p>Susie Baker King Taylor was an Army nurse in the Civil War, and the first African...

Served in the Army: CITY NEW YORK'S PICTURE NEWSPAPER EX-GI BECOMES BLONDE BEAUTY Operations Transform Bronx Youth A World of a Difference Geare W wrved in the ArmY A] fr twe yeags and as dves loralle discharge in İNL New Gerga ls mere. atal leday ate s a photegnaher in Denrk Parents were in a eter Christine (thats dearnonacepeople: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery. Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says: A World of a Difference George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently. This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3 If someone from literally one of the most intolerant decades in recent history can respectfully write about trans women current journalists have no excuse.
Served in the Army: CITY
 NEW YORK'S PICTURE NEWSPAPER
 EX-GI BECOMES
 BLONDE BEAUTY
 Operations Transform Bronx Youth
 A World of a Difference
 Geare W
 wrved in the ArmY A] fr twe yeags and as dves
 loralle discharge in İNL New Gerga ls mere.
 atal leday ate s
 a photegnaher in Denrk Parents were
 in a eter Christine (thats
dearnonacepeople:

cryingalonewithfrankenstein:

This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christine Jorgensen, one of the first women to have sex-reassignment surgery.
Since the text is a bit small and I couldn’t find a larger copy, here’s what the small blurb says:
A World of a Difference

George W. Jorgensen, Jr., son of a Bronx carpenter, served in the Army for two years and was given honorable discharge in 1946. Now George is no more. After six operations, Jorgensen’s sex has been changed and today she is a striking woman, working as a photographer in Denmark. Parents were informed of the big change in a letter Christine (that’s her new name) sent to them recently.

This article is 58 years old, and it’s more respectful of Christine’s pronoun choices and name than some publications are today. It makes me happy to see a newspaper be respectful of a trans person’s choice of name and pronouns like that :3

If someone from literally one of the most intolerant decades in recent history can respectfully write about trans women current journalists have no excuse.

dearnonacepeople: cryingalonewithfrankenstein: This photo always cheers me up a bit. It’s a front-page article from 1955 about Christin...