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Structural: goosegoblin: theramseyloft: jurassicjenday: theramseyloft: tinysaurus-rex: iwilltrytobereasonable: cant-hug-every-human: thedeadofflandersfields: Pigeon steals poppies from the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia in order to build a nest beside a stained glass window. @birdblogwhichisforbirds @snitling EXACTLY This is two pigeons, pigeons nest in bonded pairs (notice the first one is checked and its mate on the nest is barred). Usually they don’t make nests nearly so big but I guess if you have the materials, go for it. The nest is so unusually big because the vast majority is a platform to keep the actual nest (just that tiny ring in the corner around the bird sitting in it) cushioned from the anti bird spikes. This is a work of beautiful defiance. Using the very thing installed to make just a moment’s rest impossible as structural supports for an immovably stable nursery. The symbolism achieved by these pigeons is better than some writers can hope for and I love it! From the nest on the bird repellent spikes to the fact that those spikes are along the stained glass windows of a church, a place associated with sanctuary and compassion. The fact that the nest is made of stolen poppies for remembrance day hits the hardest though. Of the 54 animals to be awarded the Dickin Medal for acts of gallantry during WW2, 32 of them were pigeons. These were messengers who flew through battlefields and across borders, many of whom were killed or severely injured by enemy forces including gunfire and trained falcons. Many of their achievements saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers, and yet now their descendants are faces with anti-bird spikes, shooting and poisoning in an attempt to rid the cities from the rats with wings. I love this picture because it feels like they’re taking back just a little bit of that credit owed to them.  Reblogging for this beautiful addition. [ID: three colour photographs. The first shows a pigeon holding a fake poppy in its teeth, standing on a marble surface. The second shows a nest made of hundreds of fake poppies, cushioning a sitting pigeon from the anti-bird spikes below. The final photo is a zoomed-out picture of the nest, showing many stained glass windows surrounding it.]
Structural: goosegoblin:
theramseyloft:

jurassicjenday:


theramseyloft:

tinysaurus-rex:


iwilltrytobereasonable:

cant-hug-every-human:

thedeadofflandersfields:
Pigeon steals poppies from the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia in order to build a nest beside a stained glass window.
@birdblogwhichisforbirds


@snitling EXACTLY


This is two pigeons, pigeons nest in bonded pairs (notice the first one is checked and its mate on the nest is barred). Usually they don’t make nests nearly so big but I guess if you have the materials, go for it. 


The nest is so unusually big because the vast majority is a platform to keep the actual nest (just that tiny ring in the corner around the bird sitting in it) cushioned from the anti bird spikes.
This is a work of beautiful defiance.
Using the very thing installed to make just a moment’s rest impossible as structural supports for an immovably stable nursery.

The symbolism achieved by these pigeons is better than some writers can hope for and I love it!
From the nest on the bird repellent spikes to the fact that those spikes are along the stained glass windows of a church, a place associated with sanctuary and compassion. The fact that the nest is made of stolen poppies for remembrance day hits the hardest though. Of the 54 animals to be awarded the Dickin Medal for acts of gallantry during WW2, 32 of them were pigeons. These were messengers who flew through battlefields and across borders, many of whom were killed or severely injured by enemy forces including gunfire and trained falcons. Many of their achievements saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers, and yet now their descendants are faces with anti-bird spikes, shooting and poisoning in an attempt to rid the cities from the rats with wings. I love this picture because it feels like they’re taking back just a little bit of that credit owed to them. 


Reblogging for this beautiful addition.

[ID: three colour photographs. The first shows a pigeon holding a fake poppy in its teeth, standing on a marble surface. The second shows a nest made of hundreds of fake poppies, cushioning a sitting pigeon from the anti-bird spikes below. The final photo is a zoomed-out picture of the nest, showing many stained glass windows surrounding it.]

goosegoblin: theramseyloft: jurassicjenday: theramseyloft: tinysaurus-rex: iwilltrytobereasonable: cant-hug-every-human: thedeado...

Structural: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506 WILEY Global Change PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of dryland biocrust communities David J. Eldridge Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2. 2,3 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney,New South Wales Australia Departamento de Biología y Geología, ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos stoles, Spain operative Institute for Research in ironmental Sciences, University of rado, Boulder, Colorado Abstract Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate hens and liverwor last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec spondence J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem e, School of Biological, Earth and mental Sciences, University of New Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia eldridge@unsw.edu.au groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this
Structural: 10 August 2018 Revised: 16 October 2018 Accepted: 23 October 2018
 DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14506
 WILEY Global Change
 PRIMARY RESEARCH ARTICLE
 The influence of climatic legacies on the distribution of
 dryland biocrust communities
 David J. Eldridge
 Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo2.
 2,3
 Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of
 Biological, Earth and Environmental
 Sciences, University of New South Wales,
 Sydney,New South Wales Australia
 Departamento de Biología y Geología,
 ísica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela
 uperior de Ciencias Experimentales y
 ecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
 stoles, Spain
 operative Institute for Research in
 ironmental Sciences, University of
 rado, Boulder, Colorado
 Abstract
 Predicting the distribution of biocrust species, mosses, lic
 ated with surface soils is difficult, but climatic legacies (changes in climate
 hens and liverwor
 last 20 k years) can improve our prediction of the distribution of biocrus
 To provide empirical support for this hypothesis, we used a combination c
 analyses and structural equation modelling to identify the role of climatic
 predicting the distribution of ecological clusters formed by species
 lichens and liverworts using data from 282 large sites distributed across
 km2 of eastern Australia. Two ecological clusters contained 87% of the
 lichen and liverwort species. Both clusters contained lichen, moss and live
 cies, but were dominated by different families. Sites where the air t
 increased the most over 20k years (positive temperature legacies) were
 with reductions in the relative abundance of species from the lichen
 and Teloschistaceae) and moss (Bryaceae) families (Cluster A spec
 spondence
 J. Eldridge, Centre for Ecosystem
 e, School of Biological, Earth and
 mental Sciences, University of New
 Wales, Sydney, NSW Australia
 eldridge@unsw.edu.au
 groundstorey plant cover and lower soil pH. Sites where precipitation
 over the past 20k years (positive precipitation legacy) were ass
 increases in the relative abundance of lichen (Cladoniaceae, Leci
Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this

Trying to be an adult and read a scientific paper and your wife does this