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Think It: They didn’t think it through
Think It: They didn’t think it through

They didn’t think it through

Think It: She didn’t think it was funny
Think It: She didn’t think it was funny

She didn’t think it was funny

Think It: Don’t insult my cookie, it think it looks like a real horse.
Think It: Don’t insult my cookie, it think it looks like a real horse.

Don’t insult my cookie, it think it looks like a real horse.

Think It: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
Think It: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Think It: Trevor 12 hrs I have to admit, when Greta Thunberg began gaining popularity for her activism earlier this year, I didn't pay it much mind and just assumed it was another person complaining about global climate change without proposing and/or engaging in tangible, real world solutions. So, when I saw that she won TIME magazine's person of the year, I figured she has made great strides in combating climate change, and therefore I should probably take notice and take a look into how she is doing it and what she has proposed. Thankfully, I didn't have to look far since many people were posting her greatest hits here on FB. I admit, she appears quite passionate and she makes compelling points that something needs to be done to reverse climate change, all while being critical of everyone that says something needs to be done, but without proposing real world, tangible solutions that can broadly be applied to society. So, I keep watching and waiting for these solutions. As the videos draw to an end, I am yet to see anything of substance. Am I missing the part two of these? What is unique about her brand of activism? Is it just the accent? I am seriously interested in what reaction and results her activism has yielded. Can someone please explain it to me? I do have some issues with her "undeniable facts" and climate change activists, I will do my best to follow-up in the comments and/or other posts. Ben Grelle Yes, why isn't the 16-year old solving this crisis? What the hell, dude? Greta submitted the IPCC report as her testimony before Congress. That is what she bases her science on (as well as 99% of climate scientists) and that is where she asks people to go to look for the data and some of the solutions. (We won't have all the solutions as much of the research and emerging tech isn't well funded yet.) I don't think it is her responsibility to solve this. She is asking politicians to take this seriously. And she is inspiring a new generation to not be apathetic on this topic. That is what her activism is based on. And I think that is plenty. If you really want to look at the "real world" solutions, you can read the same report she did. There are 3 parts. The "summaries for policymakers" are the easiest to understand and a good place to start. You may need to download some PDFS. https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/ https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/ https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/ sirfrogsworth: Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change.  Some other gems in the comments… “She’s basically Hitler!” “Why isn’t she a seasoned public speaker who can give spontaneous answers to one of the world’s most complicated issues?” “She’s just a propagandist for all of those greedy climate scientists who make an average of $35-50K per year!”  And, my favorite… “Why doesn’t she time travel and sabotage Time Magazine’s printing press?” Being an advocate for the world not ending is exhausting.  But if even one of them reads even the summaries, I will be happy.  Here are the links to the report for anyone interested. They actually improved the website quite a bit from the last time I visited. I don’t even think you need to download PDFs for most of the information. PROGRESS! https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/
Think It: Trevor
 12 hrs
 I have to admit, when Greta Thunberg began gaining popularity for her
 activism earlier this year, I didn't pay it much mind and just assumed it
 was another person complaining about global climate change without
 proposing and/or engaging in tangible, real world solutions. So, when I
 saw that she won TIME magazine's person of the year, I figured she
 has made great strides in combating climate change, and therefore I
 should probably take notice and take a look into how she is doing it and
 what she has proposed. Thankfully, I didn't have to look far since many
 people were posting her greatest hits here on FB. I admit, she appears
 quite passionate and she makes compelling points that something
 needs to be done to reverse climate change, all while being critical of
 everyone that says something needs to be done, but without proposing
 real world, tangible solutions that can broadly be applied to society. So,
 I keep watching and waiting for these solutions. As the videos draw to
 an end, I am yet to see anything of substance. Am I missing the part
 two of these? What is unique about her brand of activism? Is it just the
 accent? I am seriously interested in what reaction and results her
 activism has yielded. Can someone please explain it to me? I do have
 some issues with her "undeniable facts" and climate change activists, I
 will do my best to follow-up in the comments and/or other posts.

 Ben Grelle Yes, why isn't the 16-year old solving this
 crisis? What the hell, dude?
 Greta submitted the IPCC report as her testimony before
 Congress. That is what she bases her science on (as well
 as 99% of climate scientists) and that is where she asks
 people to go to look for the data and some of the
 solutions. (We won't have all the solutions as much of the
 research and emerging tech isn't well funded yet.)
 I don't think it is her responsibility to solve this. She is
 asking politicians to take this seriously. And she is
 inspiring a new generation to not be apathetic on this
 topic. That is what her activism is based on. And I think
 that is plenty.
 If you really want to look at the "real world" solutions, you
 can read the same report she did.
 There are 3 parts. The "summaries for policymakers" are
 the easiest to understand and a good place to start. You
 may need to download some PDFS.
 https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/
 https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/
 https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/
sirfrogsworth:
Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change. 
Some other gems in the comments…
“She’s basically Hitler!”
“Why isn’t she a seasoned public speaker who can give spontaneous answers to one of the world’s most complicated issues?”
“She’s just a propagandist for all of those greedy climate scientists who make an average of $35-50K per year!” 
And, my favorite…
“Why doesn’t she time travel and sabotage Time Magazine’s printing press?”
Being an advocate for the world not ending is exhausting. 
But if even one of them reads even the summaries, I will be happy. 
Here are the links to the report for anyone interested. They actually improved the website quite a bit from the last time I visited. I don’t even think you need to download PDFs for most of the information. PROGRESS!
https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srccl/https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/

sirfrogsworth: Apparently, you can’t be a climate activist unless you know how to literally solve climate change.  Some other gems in the...

Think It: What is the loveliest thing a child has ever said to you? Richard Muller, Prof Physics, UC Berkeley, author "Now, The Physics of Time" Updated Aug 2, 2017 Originally Answered: What is the loveliest thing your child has ever said? "Would you like one, Grandpa?" OK- it was not my child but my 3-year-old granddaughter, but I still think it counts. I had read about the marshmallow test. You give a child a marshmallow, and then say that if she (Layla, in this case) could keep from eating it for 10 minutes, you'll give her a second. So I tried that test with my granddaughter (not with marshmallows, but with chocolate, which she likes much more) According to extensive experiments, children who "pass" the "marshmallow test" are far more successful in later life. They have learned a fundamental truth in life, that delayed gratification can lead to a far better long-term outcome. She sat and watched the chocolate. The 10-minute hourglass finally emptied, and she had succeeded. She asked for her second piece of chocolate. I gave it to her, and she now had two in her hand. That's when she looked up at me and asked, "Would you like one, Grandpa?" Needless to say, from that moment on I would readily give my life for her. 1.3m views View Upvoters View Sharers hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are essentially more likely to trust that they will actually get the marshmallow if they wait whereas poorer kids are generally more used to like, if you have food, eat it. and being wealthier correlates to being more successful later in life because our system is broken. so THAT’s probably why the marshmallow test is a predictor - because it tells you who is wealthy, not who is innately primed to be successful Classic correlation does not equal causation
Think It: What is the loveliest thing a child has
 ever said to you?
 Richard Muller, Prof Physics, UC Berkeley,
 author "Now, The Physics of Time"
 Updated Aug 2, 2017
 Originally Answered: What is the loveliest thing your child has ever
 said?
 "Would you like one, Grandpa?"
 OK- it was not my child but my 3-year-old
 granddaughter, but I still think it counts.
 I had read about the marshmallow test. You give a child
 a marshmallow, and then say that if she (Layla, in this
 case) could keep from eating it for 10 minutes, you'll
 give her a second. So I tried that test with my
 granddaughter (not with marshmallows, but with
 chocolate, which she likes much more)
 According to extensive experiments, children who
 "pass" the "marshmallow test" are far more successful
 in later life. They have learned a fundamental truth in
 life, that delayed gratification can lead to a far better
 long-term outcome.
 She sat and watched the chocolate. The 10-minute
 hourglass finally emptied, and she had succeeded. She
 asked for her second piece of chocolate. I gave it to her,
 and she now had two in her hand. That's when she
 looked up at me and asked, "Would you like one,
 Grandpa?"
 Needless to say, from that moment on I would readily
 give my life for her.
 1.3m views View Upvoters View Sharers
hippo-pot:

awesomacious:
The sweetest granddaughter
btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are essentially more likely to trust that they will actually get the marshmallow if they wait whereas poorer kids are generally more used to like, if you have food, eat it. and being wealthier correlates to being more successful later in life because our system is broken. so THAT’s probably why the marshmallow test is a predictor - because it tells you who is wealthy, not who is innately primed to be successful

Classic correlation does not equal causation

hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are...

Think It: Our costumes to the Halloween party. Being pretty low budget, we think it turned out ok.
Think It: Our costumes to the Halloween party. Being pretty low budget, we think it turned out ok.

Our costumes to the Halloween party. Being pretty low budget, we think it turned out ok.