🔥 | Latest

Baby, It's Cold Outside, Christmas, and Definitely: Andrew Rannells @AndrewRannells I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there teachingwithcoffee It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Carol bigbutterandeggman Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today's worldview to the song, yes, you're right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape anthem. BUT! Let's look closer! "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned, at a dudes house. In the 1940's, that's the kind of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do-and she wants people to think she's a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what shes really concerned about "the neighbors might think" "my maiden aunt's mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk tomorrow." But she's having a really good time, and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink -unaware that the drink is actually really weak, maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke That is the standard joke that's going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not a joke about how she's drunk and about to be raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she's living in a society where women aren't supposed to have sexual agency Basically, the song only makes sense in the context of a society in which women are expected to reject mens advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal and expected for a lady's gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests, because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the main theme of the man's lines in the song, suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she's using it to give all the culturally-understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can't say so She states explicitly that she's resisting because shes supposed to, not because she wants to: "I ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she'll be able to claim later that she did whats expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm gonna say that I tried." And at the end of the song they're singing together, in harmony, because they're both on the same page and they have been all along So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the same time, one of the best illustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a song about a society where women aren't allowed to say yes..which happens to mean it's also a society where women don't have a clear and unambiguous way to say no Source: matchingvnecks #baby it's cold outside #not about rape #so tired of having to explain this on 238,267 notes Dec 3rd, 2016 Its that time of year again
Baby, It's Cold Outside, Christmas, and Definitely: Andrew Rannells
 @AndrewRannells
 I don't think any more people
 need to record Baby It's Cold
 Outside. I think we're good there
 teachingwithcoffee
 It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem
 Masquerading As Christmas Carol
 bigbutterandeggman
 Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here
 Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s
 So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and
 applying today's worldview to the song, yes,
 you're right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape
 anthem.
 BUT! Let's look closer!
 "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the
 time, and the punchline was invariably that
 there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink,
 not even a significant amount of alcohol
 See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned,
 at a dudes house. In the 1940's, that's the kind
 of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do-and
 she wants people to think she's a good girl. The
 woman in the song says outright, multiple
 times, that what other people will think of her
 staying is what shes really concerned about
 "the neighbors might think" "my maiden aunt's
 mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk
 tomorrow." But she's having a really good time,
 and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing
 her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to
 the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink
 -unaware that the drink is actually really weak,
 maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke
 That is the standard joke that's going on when a
 woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th
 century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not
 a joke about how she's drunk and about to be
 raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly
 sober and about to have awesome consensual
 sex and use the drink for plausible deniability
 because she's living in a society where women
 aren't supposed to have sexual agency
 Basically, the song only makes sense in the
 context of a society in which women are
 expected to reject mens advances whether they
 actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal
 and expected for a lady's gentleman companion
 to pressure her despite her protests, because he
 knows she would have to say that whether or
 not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay
 she won't be able to justify doing so unless he
 offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying
 because I want to." (That's the main theme of
 the man's lines in the song, suggesting excuses
 she can use when people ask later why she
 spent the night at his house: it was so cold out,
 there were no cabs available, he simply insisted
 because he was concerned about my safety in
 such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent
 and definitely not about sex at all!) In this
 particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because
 the woman has a voice, and she's using it to
 give all the culturally-understood signals that
 she actually does want to stay but can't say so
 She states explicitly that she's resisting because
 shes supposed to, not because she wants to: "I
 ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly
 that she's just putting up a token resistance so
 she'll be able to claim later that she did whats
 expected of a decent woman in this situation:
 "at least I'm gonna say that I tried." And at the
 end of the song they're singing together, in
 harmony, because they're both on the same
 page and they have been all along
 So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's
 a song about a woman finding a way to exercise
 sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed
 to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the
 same time, one of the best illustrations of rape
 culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a
 song about a society where women aren't
 allowed to say yes..which happens to mean it's
 also a society where women don't have a clear
 and unambiguous way to say no
 Source: matchingvnecks #baby it's cold outside
 #not about rape #so tired of having to explain this on
 238,267 notes
 Dec 3rd, 2016
Its that time of year again

Its that time of year again

Baby, It's Cold Outside, Christmas, and Definitely: I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there teachingwithcoffee It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Caral bigbutterandeggman Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today's worldview to the song. yes, you're right, it absolutely 'sounds' like a rape anthem. BUTI Let's look closerl "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol. See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned at a dude's house. In the 1940's, that's the kind of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do - and she wants people to think she's a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what she's really concerned about: the neighbors might think," "my maiden aunt's mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk tomorrow." But she's having a really good time and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink - unaware that the drink is actually really weak maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke. That is the standard joke that's going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not a joke about how she's drunk and about to be raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she's living in a society where women aren't supposed to have sexual agency Basically, the song only makes sense in the ext of a society in which women are expected to reject men's advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal and expected for a lady's gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the main theme of the man's lines in the song suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she's using it to give all the culturally- understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can't say so. She states explicitly that she's resisting because she's supposed to, not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she'll be able to claim later that she did what's expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm oonna sav that I tried. And at the end of the that she's resisting because she's supposed to not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she' ll be able to claim later that she did what's expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm gonna say thatI tried." And at the end of the song they're singing together, in harmony because they're both on the same page and they have been all along. So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the same time, one of the best llustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a song about a society where women aren't allowed to say yes...which happens to mean it's also a society where women don't have a clear and unambiguous way to say no. Source:matchinovnecks #baby it's cold outside #not about rape #30 tired of having to explain this one 196,155 notes "C But Baby It’s Cold
Baby, It's Cold Outside, Christmas, and Definitely: I don't think any more people
 need to record Baby It's Cold
 Outside. I think we're good there
 teachingwithcoffee
 It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem
 Masquerading As Christmas Caral
 bigbutterandeggman
 Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also
 a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s
 So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance
 and applying today's worldview to the song.
 yes, you're right, it absolutely 'sounds' like a
 rape anthem.
 BUTI Let's look closerl
 "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at
 the time, and the punchline was invariably that
 there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink,
 not even a significant amount of alcohol.
 See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned
 at a dude's house. In the 1940's, that's the kind
 of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do -
 and she wants people to think she's a good girl.
 The woman in the song says outright, multiple
 times, that what other people will think of her
 staying is what she's really concerned about:
 the neighbors might think," "my maiden aunt's
 mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk
 tomorrow." But she's having a really good time
 and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing
 her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to
 the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink
 - unaware that the drink is actually really weak
 maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke.
 That is the standard joke that's going on when a
 woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th
 century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not
 a joke about how she's drunk and about to be
 raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly
 sober and about to have awesome consensual
 sex and use the drink for plausible deniability
 because she's living in a society where women
 aren't supposed to have sexual agency
 Basically, the song only makes sense in the
 ext of a society in which women are
 expected to reject men's advances whether
 they actually want to or not, and therefore it's
 normal and expected for a lady's gentleman
 companion to pressure her despite her protests
 because he knows she would have to say that
 whether or not she meant it, and if she really
 wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing
 so unless he offers her an excuse other than
 "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the
 main theme of the man's lines in the song
 suggesting excuses she can use when people
 ask later why she spent the night at his house: it
 was so cold out, there were no cabs available,
 he simply insisted because he was concerned
 about my safety in such awful weather, it was
 perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex
 at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly
 right, because the woman has a voice, and
 she's using it to give all the culturally-
 understood signals that she actually does want
 to stay but can't say so. She states explicitly
 that she's resisting because she's supposed to,
 not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no
 no..." She states explicitly that she's just
 putting up a token resistance so she'll be able
 to claim later that she did what's expected of a
 decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm
 oonna sav that I tried. And at the end of the
 that she's resisting because she's supposed to
 not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no
 no..." She states explicitly that she's just
 putting up a token resistance so she' ll be able
 to claim later that she did what's expected of a
 decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm
 gonna say thatI tried." And at the end of the
 song they're singing together, in harmony
 because they're both on the same page and
 they have been all along.
 So it's not actually a song about rape in fact
 it's a song about a woman finding a way to
 exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society
 designed to stop her from doing so. But it's
 also, at the same time, one of the best
 llustrations of rape culture that pop culture has
 ever produced. It's a song about a society
 where women aren't allowed to say yes...which
 happens to mean it's also a society where
 women don't have a clear and unambiguous
 way to say no.
 Source:matchinovnecks #baby it's cold outside
 #not about rape
 #30 tired of having to explain this one
 196,155 notes
 "C
But Baby It’s Cold

But Baby It’s Cold

Ass, Cute, and Dude: RI 85% 1 1 :24 PM Danteh 23.3K Likes Tweets Tweets& replies Media Likes Carter @Carter_OW 5h This is clearly the talk of a teen that is being taken advantage of and cannot fend for herself in this DANGEROUS internet world CARTER? These are dms of her with a closeeee friend of mine so in there !!! if he tries anything i can just take screenshots and ruin his career within one tweet Feb 9 i wish i was older tbh NO LMNAO i would DIE if i got a chance to date an OwL player THATS NOT THE PLAY Feb 9 Feb 9 . what makes u so interested in OWL ppl yes Feb 9 why is that the end all be all for u dreamkazpers a cool guy tho i АНА Feb 9 Feb 9 for some reason greasy ass gamers just get me goin that's hella cool that he'd do that for u 泄 ídk i love videogames and cute boys so its a good combination Feb 9 Feb 9 i get u i get u yeah dude hes so nice?m is he a lot older than u oh like is that actually not possible or the female part Feb 9 oh b oy his age isnt confirmed. he could be 18 or he could be lke 22. inm almosttttt 15 Feb 9 not THAt nice of a person LMAO my parents have an 11 year age gap but they both met after Feb 9 . Feb 9 he hasnt attempted anything so far so we're good 45 0 86 332 San Francisco Shock-. @SF.. . 6h The grind never ends! @Shock_Architect heavy practice time in this week Watch out @LAValiant, we are conm and the rest of the squad have put some Danteh 23.3K Likes Tweets Tweets& replies Media Likes Joji @Jojizhang 5h Replying to @aimbotcalvin Her: 'I'm only 14' Me: FUEL 92 tl 10 115 imwatchingyoufailatgames @4... 4h @Danteh don't worry my dude I got you 08 18 1 125 o owlshitpostgalore: So Dante is unstanned and deleted from my life for liking tweets that dont take the DK situation seriously and patronize the victim (:
Ass, Cute, and Dude: RI
 85%
 1 1 :24 PM
 Danteh
 23.3K Likes
 Tweets Tweets& replies Media
 Likes
 Carter @Carter_OW 5h
 This is clearly the talk of a teen that is
 being taken advantage of and cannot
 fend for herself in this DANGEROUS
 internet world
 CARTER?
 These are dms of her with a closeeee
 friend of mine
 so in there !!!
 if he tries anything i can just take screenshots and ruin his career
 within one tweet
 Feb 9
 i wish i was older tbh
 NO LMNAO
 i would DIE if i got a chance to date an OwL player
 THATS NOT THE PLAY
 Feb 9
 Feb 9 .
 what makes u so interested in OWL ppl
 yes
 Feb 9
 why is that the end all be all for u
 dreamkazpers a cool guy tho i
 АНА
 Feb 9
 Feb 9
 for some reason greasy ass gamers just get me goin
 that's hella cool that he'd do that for u
 泄
 ídk i love videogames and cute boys so its a good combination
 Feb 9
 Feb 9
 i get u i get u
 yeah dude hes so nice?m
 is he a lot older than u
 oh
 like is that actually not possible or
 the female part
 Feb 9
 oh b oy
 his age isnt confirmed. he could be 18 or he could be lke 22. inm
 almosttttt 15
 Feb 9
 not THAt nice of a person LMAO
 my parents have an 11 year age gap but they both met after
 Feb 9 .
 Feb 9
 he hasnt attempted anything so far so we're good
 45
 0 86 332
 San Francisco Shock-. @SF.. . 6h
 The grind never ends! @Shock_Architect
 heavy practice time in this week
 Watch out @LAValiant, we are conm
 and the rest of the squad have put some

 Danteh
 23.3K Likes
 Tweets Tweets& replies Media Likes
 Joji @Jojizhang 5h
 Replying to @aimbotcalvin
 Her: 'I'm only 14'
 Me:
 FUEL
 92 tl 10
 115
 imwatchingyoufailatgames @4... 4h
 @Danteh don't worry my dude I got you
 08 18 1
 125 o
owlshitpostgalore:

So Dante is unstanned and deleted from my life for liking tweets that dont take the DK situation seriously and patronize the victim (:

owlshitpostgalore: So Dante is unstanned and deleted from my life for liking tweets that dont take the DK situation seriously and patronize...

Children, Club, and Creepy: At the end of the road is a big old mansion that could house several families, but it only has two inhabitants: Old, rich Mrs. Poppel and her butler Adam. Mrs. Poppel was never much of a smiler, but there doesn't seem to be a mean bone in her. If children kick a ball into her garden she doesn't make a fuzz, just nods at them and watch as they retrieve it. Most days people can see her embroide own little ring by the window, seemingly caught up in her She is peculiar, but never bothers anyone She's just an old lady who spends her days sowing and socializing at the local book club Tell your sister I hope she gets well soon. Adam is quite different. Always smiling and friendly. Always ready to help if he has the time. He's incredibly popular in town,F not to mention at the pub when he has a few hours off. He drinks, laughs and sings, and can even be talked into playing the guitar if asked enough times. Women love him too, but he just winks at them and jokes that he's committed to Mrs. Poppel. It's his own fault that people started spreading rumors that he was really Mrs s live-in lover who had been put to work around the house Typically Adam he just played along. "I don't kiss and tell" When some drunk lads saw him walk arm in arm with Mrs. Poppel down the street, no doubt to steady her, they teasingly shouted "Taking your sweetheart out fora stroll?!" while making kissing sounds been up to now?" l looked up at him like, "What have you They're an odd pair, but they seem happy together in the big house Pork? Again? I'm sorry, Mrs Im still waiting for a delivery Adam even does things not expected of a butler, like gardening while she rests in a sun chair, which has only added fuel to the rumors SU way, Adam d every once in a while something incredible happens; Mrs smiles. No one knows how Adam does it, but neither is it a surprise to anyone It l An Only one truly odd thing has ever happened to them One night a neighbor saw a man sneaking around the house testing the cellar windows. The bedroom. That's where old ladies keep all the good stuff She didn't see him get in, but suddenly he was gone so she grabbed the phone and called the police, just to be safe. What!? She's still home? That means her boy-toy has to be somewhere in the house too- Huh? Adam opened the door dressed in a robe when the police rang the doorbell. He woke up Mrs. Poppel and together they could confirm that the house hadn't been broken into. The officers couldn't find anything out of the ordinary, but gave Mrs Poppel a number to call if they saw anything The following day a man by the name Eric was reported missing. He had lived a rough life of petty crime and robbery, and sometimes didn't contact his friends or family for weeks so it was impossible to say when exactly he disappears. It could have been that same day, or two weeks prior People wondered if maybe he had been the man sneaking around outside Mrs. Poppel's house, but everyone agreed that it was probably just a coincidence. After all, people like him went missing all the time in the surrounding towns. And even if it was him, what did it matter? Mrs. Poppel and Adam were good eople who were loved by the whole town. There was no reason to cause trouble for them, no matter what their relationship was. Besides, Mrs. Poppel had one of her good weeks after that night, seeming a lot more cheerful and happy. It would be a shame to ruin it. thehumon: I’m not entirely sure if this story has a supernatural element to it or not. Are they just run of the mill cannibals or vampires/demons? Occultists? Maybe only Adam? So many possibilities. I also struggled a lot with Adam’s looks. I wanted him to look like an honest to god nice, charming guy who also looked super creepy in the right (wrong?) light. There was supposed to be a whole backstory about Mrs. Poppel’s husband and when Adam came into her life, but I decided to leave it out as it was already pretty text heavy.
Children, Club, and Creepy: At the end of the road is a big old mansion that could house several families, but it
 only has two inhabitants: Old, rich Mrs. Poppel and her butler Adam.
 Mrs. Poppel was never much of a smiler, but there doesn't
 seem to be a mean bone in her. If children kick a ball into
 her garden she doesn't make a fuzz, just nods at them and
 watch as they retrieve it. Most days people can see her
 embroide
 own little
 ring by
 the window, seemingly caught up in her
 She is peculiar, but never bothers anyone
 She's just an old lady who spends her days sowing and
 socializing at the local book club
 Tell your sister I hope she gets well soon.
 Adam is quite different. Always smiling and friendly. Always
 ready to help if he has the time. He's incredibly popular in town,F
 not to mention at the pub when he has a few hours off. He
 drinks, laughs and sings, and can even be talked into playing the
 guitar if asked enough times. Women love him too, but he just
 winks at them and jokes that he's committed to Mrs. Poppel.

 It's his own fault that people started spreading rumors that he was really
 Mrs
 s live-in lover who had been put to work around the house
 Typically Adam he just played along. "I don't kiss and tell"
 When some drunk lads saw him walk arm in arm with Mrs. Poppel down the street,
 no doubt to steady her, they teasingly shouted "Taking your sweetheart out fora
 stroll?!" while making kissing sounds
 been up to now?"
 l looked up at him like, "What have you
 They're an odd pair, but they seem
 happy together in the big house
 Pork? Again?
 I'm sorry, Mrs
 Im still waiting
 for a delivery
 Adam even does things not expected
 of a butler, like gardening while she
 rests in a sun chair, which has only
 added fuel to the rumors
 SU
 way, Adam
 d every once in a while something
 incredible happens; Mrs
 smiles. No one knows how Adam
 does it, but neither is it a surprise to
 anyone
 It l
 An
 Only one truly odd thing has ever happened to them
 One night a neighbor saw a man sneaking around the house
 testing the cellar windows.
 The bedroom.
 That's where old ladies keep
 all the good stuff

 She didn't see him get in, but suddenly he was gone so she grabbed the phone and
 called the police, just to be safe.
 What!? She's still home?
 That means her boy-toy has to be
 somewhere in the house too-
 Huh?

 Adam opened the door dressed in a robe when the police rang the doorbell.
 He woke up Mrs. Poppel and together they could confirm that the house hadn't been
 broken into. The officers couldn't find anything out of the ordinary, but gave Mrs
 Poppel a number to call if they saw anything
 The following day a man by the name Eric was reported missing. He had lived a
 rough life of petty crime and robbery, and sometimes didn't contact his friends or
 family for weeks so it was impossible to say when exactly he disappears. It could
 have been that same day, or two weeks prior People wondered if maybe he had
 been the man sneaking around outside Mrs. Poppel's house, but everyone agreed
 that it was probably just a coincidence. After all, people like him went missing all
 the time in the surrounding towns.
 And even if it was him, what did it matter? Mrs. Poppel and Adam were good
 eople who were loved by the whole town. There was no reason to cause trouble for
 them, no matter what their relationship was.

 Besides, Mrs. Poppel had one of her good weeks after that night, seeming a lot more
 cheerful and happy. It would be a shame to ruin it.
thehumon:
I’m not entirely sure if this story has a supernatural element to it or not. Are they just run of the mill cannibals or vampires/demons? Occultists? Maybe only Adam? So many possibilities.
I also struggled a lot with Adam’s looks. I wanted him to look like an honest to god nice, charming guy who also looked super creepy in the right (wrong?) light.
There was supposed to be a whole backstory about Mrs. Poppel’s husband and when Adam came into her life, but I decided to leave it out as it was already pretty text heavy.

thehumon: I’m not entirely sure if this story has a supernatural element to it or not. Are they just run of the mill cannibals or vampires/d...